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Experimental enteric infection of gnotobiotic piglets with Chlamydia suis strain S45


Guscetti, F; Schiller, I; Sydler, T; Heinen, E; Pospischil, A (2009). Experimental enteric infection of gnotobiotic piglets with Chlamydia suis strain S45. Veterinary Microbiology, 135(1-2):157-168.

Abstract

Enteric chlamydial infections of pigs with Chlamydia (C.) suis are frequent and often subclinical. The enteric pathogenicity of C. suis strain S45 was investigated in gnotobiotic piglets. Piglets from three litters (n=31) were inoculated with egg-grown chlamydiae at 2-3 days of age (n=17) or used as controls (n=14). They were observed for clinical signs, killed and necropsied sequentially at 2-13 days postinoculation (DPI). Feces were collected daily and investigated with an ELISA for chlamydial antigen. At necropsy, specimens were collected for histopathology and for immunohistochemical, PCR-based, and serological (complement fixation test, ELISA) detection of chlamydiae. Chlamydial replication and associated symptoms and lesions were observed from 2 to 13 DPI and were particularly pronounced within the first week PI. Clinical symptoms consisted of moderate-to-severe diarrhea, slight and transient anorexia, weakness and body weight loss. Immunohistochemistry and ELISA revealed that chlamydial replication was particularly marked at 2-4 DPI and primarily located in the small intestinal villus enterocytes. Further sites of replication included large intestinal enterocytes, the lamina propria and Tunica submucosa, and the mesenteric lymphnodes. Histopathological changes included moderate-to-severe villus atrophy with flattened enterocytes and focal villus tip erosions, and moderate mucosal inflammatory cell infiltrates and lymphangitis in the small intestine. PCR of spleen tissue and blood was mostly negative for chlamydiae, indicating that they did not substantially disseminate into the host up to 13 DPI. All sera were negative for anti-chlamydial antibodies. In conclusion, C. suis strain S45 elicited significant enteric disease and lesions in gnotobiotic piglets indicating its pathogenic potential for swine.

Enteric chlamydial infections of pigs with Chlamydia (C.) suis are frequent and often subclinical. The enteric pathogenicity of C. suis strain S45 was investigated in gnotobiotic piglets. Piglets from three litters (n=31) were inoculated with egg-grown chlamydiae at 2-3 days of age (n=17) or used as controls (n=14). They were observed for clinical signs, killed and necropsied sequentially at 2-13 days postinoculation (DPI). Feces were collected daily and investigated with an ELISA for chlamydial antigen. At necropsy, specimens were collected for histopathology and for immunohistochemical, PCR-based, and serological (complement fixation test, ELISA) detection of chlamydiae. Chlamydial replication and associated symptoms and lesions were observed from 2 to 13 DPI and were particularly pronounced within the first week PI. Clinical symptoms consisted of moderate-to-severe diarrhea, slight and transient anorexia, weakness and body weight loss. Immunohistochemistry and ELISA revealed that chlamydial replication was particularly marked at 2-4 DPI and primarily located in the small intestinal villus enterocytes. Further sites of replication included large intestinal enterocytes, the lamina propria and Tunica submucosa, and the mesenteric lymphnodes. Histopathological changes included moderate-to-severe villus atrophy with flattened enterocytes and focal villus tip erosions, and moderate mucosal inflammatory cell infiltrates and lymphangitis in the small intestine. PCR of spleen tissue and blood was mostly negative for chlamydiae, indicating that they did not substantially disseminate into the host up to 13 DPI. All sera were negative for anti-chlamydial antibodies. In conclusion, C. suis strain S45 elicited significant enteric disease and lesions in gnotobiotic piglets indicating its pathogenic potential for swine.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:March 2009
Deposited On:28 Jan 2009 12:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:34
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0378-1135
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.vetmic.2008.09.038
PubMed ID:18950966
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-5746

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