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Predator or prey? Chlamydophila abortus infections of a free-living amoebae, Acanthamoeba castellani 9GU


Wirz, M; Polkinghorne, A; Dumrese, C; Ziegler, U; Greub, G; Pospischil, A; Vaughan, L (2008). Predator or prey? Chlamydophila abortus infections of a free-living amoebae, Acanthamoeba castellani 9GU. Microbes and Infection, 10(6):591-597.

Abstract

Limited evidence exists to suggest that the ability to invade and escape protozoan host cell bactericidal activity extends to members of the Chlamydiaceae, intracellular pathogens of humans and animals and evolutionary descendants of amoeba-resisting Chlamydia-like organisms. PCR and microscopic analyses of Chlamydophila abortus infections of Acanthamoeba castellani revealed uptake of this chlamydial pathogen but, unlike the well-described inhabitant of A. castellani, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae, Cp. abortus did not appear to propagate and is likely digested by its amoebal host. These data raise doubts about the ability of free-living amoebae to serve as hosts and vectors of pathogenic members of the Chlamydiaceae but reveal opportunities, via comparative genomics, to understand virulence mechanisms used by Chlamydia-like organisms to avoid amoebal digestion.

Limited evidence exists to suggest that the ability to invade and escape protozoan host cell bactericidal activity extends to members of the Chlamydiaceae, intracellular pathogens of humans and animals and evolutionary descendants of amoeba-resisting Chlamydia-like organisms. PCR and microscopic analyses of Chlamydophila abortus infections of Acanthamoeba castellani revealed uptake of this chlamydial pathogen but, unlike the well-described inhabitant of A. castellani, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae, Cp. abortus did not appear to propagate and is likely digested by its amoebal host. These data raise doubts about the ability of free-living amoebae to serve as hosts and vectors of pathogenic members of the Chlamydiaceae but reveal opportunities, via comparative genomics, to understand virulence mechanisms used by Chlamydia-like organisms to avoid amoebal digestion.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Microscopy and Image Analysis
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2008
Deposited On:06 Jan 2009 14:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:34
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1286-4579
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.micinf.2008.01.006
PubMed ID:18467146
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-5749

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