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Sleep disturbance impairs stroke recovery in the rat


Zunzunegui, C; Gao, B; Cam, E; Hodor, A; Bassetti, C L (2011). Sleep disturbance impairs stroke recovery in the rat. Sleep, 34(9):1261-1269.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

There is a lack of experimental evidence to support the hypothesis that sleep may modulate stroke outcome as suggested by clinical observations. We have previously shown that sleep disturbance (SDis) over 3 days aggravates brain damage in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. The aim of this study is to further investigate effects of SDis on long-term stroke recovery and neuroplasticity as assessed by axonal sprouting, neurogenesis, and angiogenesis.
DESIGN:

Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by permanent occlusion of the distal branches of middle cerebral artery. Twelve hours after initiation of ischemia, SDis was performed over 3 consecutive days (deprivation of 80% sleep during the 12-h light phase). Weekly assessments on sensorimotor function by the single pellet reaching test (SPR) were performed for 5 weeks after surgery. Axonal sprouting was evaluated by anterograde tracing with biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) and neurogenesis/angiogenesis by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labelling along with cell-type markers. Control groups included ischemia without SDis, sham with SDis, and sham without SDis.
SETTING:

Basic sleep research laboratory.
MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Rats subjected to SDis after ischemia showed significantly less recovery of forearm motor skills during the post-stroke period of 5 weeks. This effect was accompanied by a substantial reduction in axonal sprouting, expression of synaptophysin, and the ischemia-stimulated neural and vascular cell proliferation.
CONCLUSION:

SDis has detrimental effects on functional and morphological/structural outcomes after stroke, suggesting a role of sleep in the modulation of recovery processes and neuroplasticity.

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

There is a lack of experimental evidence to support the hypothesis that sleep may modulate stroke outcome as suggested by clinical observations. We have previously shown that sleep disturbance (SDis) over 3 days aggravates brain damage in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. The aim of this study is to further investigate effects of SDis on long-term stroke recovery and neuroplasticity as assessed by axonal sprouting, neurogenesis, and angiogenesis.
DESIGN:

Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by permanent occlusion of the distal branches of middle cerebral artery. Twelve hours after initiation of ischemia, SDis was performed over 3 consecutive days (deprivation of 80% sleep during the 12-h light phase). Weekly assessments on sensorimotor function by the single pellet reaching test (SPR) were performed for 5 weeks after surgery. Axonal sprouting was evaluated by anterograde tracing with biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) and neurogenesis/angiogenesis by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labelling along with cell-type markers. Control groups included ischemia without SDis, sham with SDis, and sham without SDis.
SETTING:

Basic sleep research laboratory.
MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Rats subjected to SDis after ischemia showed significantly less recovery of forearm motor skills during the post-stroke period of 5 weeks. This effect was accompanied by a substantial reduction in axonal sprouting, expression of synaptophysin, and the ischemia-stimulated neural and vascular cell proliferation.
CONCLUSION:

SDis has detrimental effects on functional and morphological/structural outcomes after stroke, suggesting a role of sleep in the modulation of recovery processes and neuroplasticity.

Citations

25 citations in Web of Science®
27 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:30 Jan 2012 08:41
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:31
Publisher:Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC
ISSN:0161-8105
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.5665/SLEEP.1252
PubMed ID:21886364
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-57532

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