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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-57585

Koyabu, D; Endo, H; Mitgutsch, C; Suwa, G; Catania, K C; Zollikofer, C P E; Oda, S i; Koyasu, K; Ando, M; Sánchez-Villagra, M R (2011). Heterochrony and developmental modularity of cranial osteogenesis in lipotyphlan mammals. EvoDevo, 2(21):1-18.

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Abstract

Background
Here we provide the most comprehensive study to date on the cranial ossification sequence in Lipotyphla, the group which includes shrews, moles and hedgehogs. This unique group, which encapsulates diverse ecological modes, such as terrestrial, subterranean, and aquatic lifestyles, is used to examine the evolutionary lability of cranial osteogenesis and to investigate the modularity of development.

Results
An acceleration of developmental timing of the vomeronasal complex has occurred in the common ancestor of moles. However, ossification of the nasal bone has shifted late in the more terrestrial shrew mole. Among the lipotyphlans, sequence heterochrony shows no significant association with modules derived from developmental origins (that is, neural crest cells vs. mesoderm derived parts) or with those derived from ossification modes (that is, dermal vs. endochondral ossification).

Conclusions
The drastic acceleration of vomeronasal development in moles is most likely coupled with the increased importance of the rostrum for digging and its use as a specialized tactile surface, both fossorial adaptations. The late development of the nasal in shrew moles, a condition also displayed by hedgehogs and shrews, is suggested to be the result of an ecological reversal to terrestrial lifestyle and reduced functional importance of the rostrum. As an overall pattern in lipotyphlans, our results reject the hypothesis that ossification sequence heterochrony occurs in modular fashion when considering the developmental patterns of the skull. We suggest that shifts in the cranial ossification sequence are not evolutionarily constrained by developmental origins or mode of ossification.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Paleontological Institute and Museum
07 Faculty of Science > Anthropological Institute and Museum
DDC:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
560 Fossils & prehistoric life
Uncontrolled Keywords:skull; heterochrony; Eulipotyphla; embryology; ossification; integration; phylogeny; micro CT
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:03 Feb 2012 08:21
Last Modified:02 Oct 2014 13:11
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:2041-9139
Publisher DOI:10.1186/2041-9139-2-21
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 13
Google Scholar™
Scopus®. Citation Count: 17

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