UZH-Logo

Mobilization of storage iron is reflected in the iron isotopic composition of blood in humans


Hotz, K; Krayenbuehl, P A; Walczyk, T (2012). Mobilization of storage iron is reflected in the iron isotopic composition of blood in humans. Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, 17(2):301-309.

Abstract

We recently showed in an animal model that iron isotopic composition varies substantially between different organs. For instance, iron in ferritin-rich organs-such as the major storage tissues liver, spleen, and bone marrow-contain a larger fraction of the heavy iron isotopes compared with other tissues, including blood. As a consequence, partitioning of body iron into red blood cells and storage compartments should be reflected in the isotopic pattern of blood iron. To confirm this hypothesis, we monitored blood iron isotope patterns in iron-overloaded subjects undergoing phlebotomy treatment by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. We found that bloodletting and consequential replacement of lost blood iron by storage iron led to a substantial increase of the heavy isotope fraction in the blood. The progress of iron depletion therapy and blood loss was quantitatively traceable by isotopic shifts of as much as +1‰ in δ((56)Fe). These results show that-together with iron absorption efficiency-partitioning of iron between blood and iron storage tissues is an important determinant of blood iron isotopic patterns, which could make blood iron isotopic composition the first composite measure of iron metabolism in humans.

We recently showed in an animal model that iron isotopic composition varies substantially between different organs. For instance, iron in ferritin-rich organs-such as the major storage tissues liver, spleen, and bone marrow-contain a larger fraction of the heavy iron isotopes compared with other tissues, including blood. As a consequence, partitioning of body iron into red blood cells and storage compartments should be reflected in the isotopic pattern of blood iron. To confirm this hypothesis, we monitored blood iron isotope patterns in iron-overloaded subjects undergoing phlebotomy treatment by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. We found that bloodletting and consequential replacement of lost blood iron by storage iron led to a substantial increase of the heavy isotope fraction in the blood. The progress of iron depletion therapy and blood loss was quantitatively traceable by isotopic shifts of as much as +1‰ in δ((56)Fe). These results show that-together with iron absorption efficiency-partitioning of iron between blood and iron storage tissues is an important determinant of blood iron isotopic patterns, which could make blood iron isotopic composition the first composite measure of iron metabolism in humans.

Citations

14 citations in Web of Science®
17 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:01 Feb 2012 21:39
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:32
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0949-8257
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00775-011-0851-2
PubMed ID:22002846

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations