UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The cost of war and the cost of health xare - an epidemiological study of asylum seekers


Bischoff, A; Denhaerynck, K; Schneider, M; Battegay, E (2011). The cost of war and the cost of health xare - an epidemiological study of asylum seekers. Swiss Medical Weekly, 141:w13252.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study was to explore differences in health care costs for asylum seekers from countries experiencing violent conflict and those from countries experiencing no violent conflict. METHDODS: Data were collected from a representative sample of refugees in an urban Swiss canton who were assigned to a Health Maintenance Organisation that covered all their health care costs. Cost differences for individuals coming from countries experiencing violent conflicts and from countries experiencing no violent conflict were tested by using multiple regression techniques and by controlling for confounding demographic, clinical and migration-related variables.
RESULTS:

Health care costs were higher for patients from countries with violent conflict. The higher costs could be attributed in part to increased frequencies of somatic diseases, however, the higher costs were linked primarily to the duration of the asylum seeker's enrolment in the insurance programme, the number of visits to the medical facility, and the procedural status of the person's application for asylum.
CONCLUSIONS:

Despite a higher prevalence of illness in patients from countries with violent conflict, the length of time spent in administrative "asylum seeker" status seemed to be the main driver of health care costs. Language barriers may be skewing results, with respect to the importance of specific diagnoses (especially mental health disorders), in driving costs upward. These results indicate a need for more comprehensive screening strategies for asylum seekers in receiving countries, particularly for those from countries in conflict.

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study was to explore differences in health care costs for asylum seekers from countries experiencing violent conflict and those from countries experiencing no violent conflict. METHDODS: Data were collected from a representative sample of refugees in an urban Swiss canton who were assigned to a Health Maintenance Organisation that covered all their health care costs. Cost differences for individuals coming from countries experiencing violent conflicts and from countries experiencing no violent conflict were tested by using multiple regression techniques and by controlling for confounding demographic, clinical and migration-related variables.
RESULTS:

Health care costs were higher for patients from countries with violent conflict. The higher costs could be attributed in part to increased frequencies of somatic diseases, however, the higher costs were linked primarily to the duration of the asylum seeker's enrolment in the insurance programme, the number of visits to the medical facility, and the procedural status of the person's application for asylum.
CONCLUSIONS:

Despite a higher prevalence of illness in patients from countries with violent conflict, the length of time spent in administrative "asylum seeker" status seemed to be the main driver of health care costs. Language barriers may be skewing results, with respect to the importance of specific diagnoses (especially mental health disorders), in driving costs upward. These results indicate a need for more comprehensive screening strategies for asylum seekers in receiving countries, particularly for those from countries in conflict.

Citations

5 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

25 downloads since deposited on 06 Feb 2012
5 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:06 Feb 2012 21:08
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:32
Publisher:EMH Swiss Medical Publishers Ltd
ISSN:1424-7860 (P) 1424-3997 (E)
Publisher DOI:10.4414/smw.2011.13252
PubMed ID:21989905
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-57799

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 527kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations