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Misregulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activity and cell type-specific loss of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis in the cerebellum of aged rats


Malanga, M; Romano, M; Ferone, A; Petrella, A; Monti, G; Jones, R; Limatola, E; Farina, B (2005). Misregulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activity and cell type-specific loss of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis in the cerebellum of aged rats. Journal of Neurochemistry, 93(4):1000-1009.

Abstract

Protein modification by ADP-ribose polymers is a common regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells and is involved in several aspects of brain physiology and physiopathology, including neurotransmission, memory formation, neurotoxicity, ageing and age-associated diseases. Here we show age-related misregulation of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis in rat cerebellum as revealed by: (i) reduced poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation in response to enzymatic DNA cleavage, (ii) altered protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation profiles in isolated nuclei, and (iii) cell type-specific loss of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity in granule cell layer and Purkinje cells in vivo. In particular, although PARP-1 could be detected in virtually all granule cells, only a fraction of them appeared to be actively engaged in poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis and this fraction was reduced in old rat cerebellum. NAD(+), quantified in tissue homogenates, was essentially the same in the cerebellum of young and old rats suggesting that in vivo factors other than PARP-1 content and/or NAD(+) levels may be responsible for the age-associated lowering of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis. Moreover, PARP-1 expression was substantially down-regulated in Purkinje cells of senescent rats.

Protein modification by ADP-ribose polymers is a common regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells and is involved in several aspects of brain physiology and physiopathology, including neurotransmission, memory formation, neurotoxicity, ageing and age-associated diseases. Here we show age-related misregulation of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis in rat cerebellum as revealed by: (i) reduced poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation in response to enzymatic DNA cleavage, (ii) altered protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation profiles in isolated nuclei, and (iii) cell type-specific loss of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity in granule cell layer and Purkinje cells in vivo. In particular, although PARP-1 could be detected in virtually all granule cells, only a fraction of them appeared to be actively engaged in poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis and this fraction was reduced in old rat cerebellum. NAD(+), quantified in tissue homogenates, was essentially the same in the cerebellum of young and old rats suggesting that in vivo factors other than PARP-1 content and/or NAD(+) levels may be responsible for the age-associated lowering of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis. Moreover, PARP-1 expression was substantially down-regulated in Purkinje cells of senescent rats.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:May 2005
Deposited On:27 Mar 2009 14:31
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:35
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0022-3042
Funders:others
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1471-4159.2005.03082.x
PubMed ID:15857403
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-5785

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