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More than just strand breaks: the recognition of structural DNA discontinuities by DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit.


Dip, R; Naegeli, H (2005). More than just strand breaks: the recognition of structural DNA discontinuities by DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit. FASEB Journal, 19(7):704-715.

Abstract

The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a trimeric factor originally identified as an enzyme that becomes activated upon incubation with DNA. Genetic defects in either the catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) or the two Ku components of DNA-PK result in immunodeficiency, radiosensitivity, and premature aging. This combined phenotype is generally attributed to the requirement for DNA-PK in the repair of DNA double strand breaks during various biological processes. However, recent studies revealed that DNA-PK(CS), a member of the growing family of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases, participates in signal transduction cascades related to apoptotic cell death, telomere maintenance and other pathways of genome surveillance. These manifold functions of DNA-PK(CS) have been associated with an increasing number of protein interaction partners and phosphorylation targets. Here we review the DNA binding properties of DNA-PK(CS) and highlight its ability to interact with an astounding diversity of nucleic acid substrates. This survey indicates that the large catalytic subunit of DNA-PK functions as a sensor of not only broken DNA molecules, but of a wider spectrum of aberrant, unusual, or specialized structures that interrupt the standard double helical conformation of DNA.

The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a trimeric factor originally identified as an enzyme that becomes activated upon incubation with DNA. Genetic defects in either the catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) or the two Ku components of DNA-PK result in immunodeficiency, radiosensitivity, and premature aging. This combined phenotype is generally attributed to the requirement for DNA-PK in the repair of DNA double strand breaks during various biological processes. However, recent studies revealed that DNA-PK(CS), a member of the growing family of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases, participates in signal transduction cascades related to apoptotic cell death, telomere maintenance and other pathways of genome surveillance. These manifold functions of DNA-PK(CS) have been associated with an increasing number of protein interaction partners and phosphorylation targets. Here we review the DNA binding properties of DNA-PK(CS) and highlight its ability to interact with an astounding diversity of nucleic acid substrates. This survey indicates that the large catalytic subunit of DNA-PK functions as a sensor of not only broken DNA molecules, but of a wider spectrum of aberrant, unusual, or specialized structures that interrupt the standard double helical conformation of DNA.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:May 2005
Deposited On:27 Mar 2009 14:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:35
Publisher:Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
ISSN:0892-6638
Funders:Swiss National Science Foundation
Publisher DOI:10.1096/fj.04-3041rev
Official URL:http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/reprint/19/7/704.pdf
PubMed ID:15857885
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-5790

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