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Therapeutic relationships in vocational rehabilitation: Predicting good relationships for people with psychosis


Catty, J; White, S; Koletsi, M; Becker, T; Fioritti, A; Kalkan, R; Lauber, C; Lissouba, P; Rössler, W; Tomov, T; van Busschbach, J T; Wiersma, D; Burns, T (2011). Therapeutic relationships in vocational rehabilitation: Predicting good relationships for people with psychosis. Psychiatry Research, 187(1-2):68-73.

Abstract

Therapeutic relationships between clients and vocational rehabilitation workers have been shown to predict entering competitive employment. We aimed to determine predictors of good relationships, using data from an international randomized controlled trial of supported employment (n=312). Baseline predictors of early therapeutic relationships with vocational workers were assessed, along with the impact of vocational status and changing clinical and social functioning variables on relationship ratings over time. Associations between client and professional relationship ratings were also explored. Better early client-rated therapeutic relationship was predicted by better baseline relationship with the clinical keyworker, being in the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) service, the absence of work history and a greater proportion of care needs being met, whereas over time it was predicted by being in the IPS service. Professional-rated early relationship was predicted by social disability and remission, while over time it was predicted by being the same sex as the client, duration of the relationship and the client's increasing anxiety. Client and professional ratings were positively associated but clients' ratings were higher than professionals', particularly in the IPS service. Relationships were better where clients may have been more motivated to engage, including by their prior experience of a good therapeutic relationship with the clinical keyworker.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Therapeutic relationships between clients and vocational rehabilitation workers have been shown to predict entering competitive employment. We aimed to determine predictors of good relationships, using data from an international randomized controlled trial of supported employment (n=312). Baseline predictors of early therapeutic relationships with vocational workers were assessed, along with the impact of vocational status and changing clinical and social functioning variables on relationship ratings over time. Associations between client and professional relationship ratings were also explored. Better early client-rated therapeutic relationship was predicted by better baseline relationship with the clinical keyworker, being in the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) service, the absence of work history and a greater proportion of care needs being met, whereas over time it was predicted by being in the IPS service. Professional-rated early relationship was predicted by social disability and remission, while over time it was predicted by being the same sex as the client, duration of the relationship and the client's increasing anxiety. Client and professional ratings were positively associated but clients' ratings were higher than professionals', particularly in the IPS service. Relationships were better where clients may have been more motivated to engage, including by their prior experience of a good therapeutic relationship with the clinical keyworker.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical and Social Psychiatry Zurich West (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:09 Feb 2012 22:36
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:32
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0165-1781 (P) 1872-7123 (E)
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2010.10.018
PubMed ID:21094532
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-57926

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