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Methods to study communication in whales.


Di Iorio, L (2005). Methods to study communication in whales. Cognition, Brain, Behavior, 9(3):583-589.

Abstract

In order to get insights into the communication system of a species, we need to study the nature of the signal (i.e. visual, auditory, olfactory, or tactile), the mechanisms of signal production, the medium of transmission (air or water), and functions of signals. Because in an aquatic environment, sound travels much farther than light, cetaceans (whales and dolphins) have strongly increased their sensitivity for acoustical stimuli. In this chapter, I will focus on the techniques currently used for studying the main communication vehicle for whales: acoustic signals.

In order to get insights into the communication system of a species, we need to study the nature of the signal (i.e. visual, auditory, olfactory, or tactile), the mechanisms of signal production, the medium of transmission (air or water), and functions of signals. Because in an aquatic environment, sound travels much farther than light, cetaceans (whales and dolphins) have strongly increased their sensitivity for acoustical stimuli. In this chapter, I will focus on the techniques currently used for studying the main communication vehicle for whales: acoustic signals.

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2005
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:14
Publisher:Romanian Association of Cognitive Sciences
ISSN:1224-8398

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