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Empirical modeling of policy diffusion in federal states: the dyadic approach


Gilardi, F; Füglister, K (2008). Empirical modeling of policy diffusion in federal states: the dyadic approach. Swiss Political Science Review, 14(3):413-450.

Abstract

Policy diffusion is a common phenomenon in federal states: indeed, one of the normative justifications of decentralized policy making is that it permits the development and spread of best practices. Following Berry and Berry (1990), event-history analysis has been the method of choice for the quantitative investigation of policy diffusion, but Volden (2006) has recently introduced a dyadic variant of this method in which units of analysis are not states but, instead, pairs of states. This article discusses the dyadic approach with a particular focus on the diffusion of policies in Switzerland. The goal is not to introduce a new method, but rather to provide a practical overview for researchers interested in using it. The article shows how the method has migrated from the international relations literature to the policy-diffusion literature, describes the typical structure of a dyadic dataset in a diffusion context, and discusses several modeling issues. The usefulness of the dyadic approach is illustrated empirically with the example of health-insurance subsidy policies in Swiss cantons.

Abstract

Policy diffusion is a common phenomenon in federal states: indeed, one of the normative justifications of decentralized policy making is that it permits the development and spread of best practices. Following Berry and Berry (1990), event-history analysis has been the method of choice for the quantitative investigation of policy diffusion, but Volden (2006) has recently introduced a dyadic variant of this method in which units of analysis are not states but, instead, pairs of states. This article discusses the dyadic approach with a particular focus on the diffusion of policies in Switzerland. The goal is not to introduce a new method, but rather to provide a practical overview for researchers interested in using it. The article shows how the method has migrated from the international relations literature to the policy-diffusion literature, describes the typical structure of a dyadic dataset in a diffusion context, and discusses several modeling issues. The usefulness of the dyadic approach is illustrated empirically with the example of health-insurance subsidy policies in Swiss cantons.

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23 citations in Web of Science®
24 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Political Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:320 Political science
Uncontrolled Keywords:Policy Diffusion, Federalism; Health Care, Event-history Analysis, Dyadic Approach
Language:English
Date:June 2008
Deposited On:16 Dec 2008 15:41
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:35
Publisher:Swiss Political Science Association
ISSN:1424-7755
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/j.1662-6370.2008.tb00108.x
Official URL:http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/spsa/spsr/2008/00000014/00000003/art00001
Related URLs:http://new.spsr.ch/ (Publisher)

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