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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-58637

Cavelti, M; Kvrgic, S; Beck, E M; Rüsch, N; Vauth, R (2012). Self-stigma and its relationship with insight, demoralization, and clinical outcome among people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 53(5):468-479.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Paradoxically, insight is associated with positive outcomes, such as better treatment adherence and recovery, and negative outcomes, such as depression, hopelessness, low self-esteem, and quality of life. Self-stigma as a moderating variable can be decisive whether more insight leads to better or worse outcome. On the other hand, self-stigma can act as a mediator between insight and outcomes. We therefore examined self-stigma both as a moderator and a mediator.
METHODS:

Insight, self-stigma, demoralization, symptoms, and functioning were assessed among 145 outpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders using questionnaires and structured interviews. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the cross-sectional data.
RESULTS:

Results confirmed self-stigma as a moderator: The association of insight and demoralization was stronger as self-stigma increased. Self-stigma also partially mediated the positive relationship between insight and demoralization. Moreover, demoralization fully mediated the adverse associations of self-stigma with psychotic symptoms and global functioning.
DISCUSSION:

Given the decisive role of self-stigma regarding the detrimental consequences of insight, interventions should address self-stigma, particularly if psychoeducational or other interventions have increased insight. Therapeutic implications for changes of dysfunctional beliefs related to illness and self and change of self-concept in the context of recovery at the level of narrative identity are discussed.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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9 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical and Social Psychiatry Zurich West (former)
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:10 Feb 2012 09:42
Last Modified:02 Dec 2013 20:16
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0010-440X (P) 1532-8384 (E)
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.comppsych.2011.08.001
PubMed ID:21956043

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