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Absolutnye prichastnye konstruktsii v pozdnedrevneangliyskih perevodah Biblii


Timofeeva, Olga (2012). Absolutnye prichastnye konstruktsii v pozdnedrevneangliyskih perevodah Biblii. In: Uspenskij, Fjodor. Imenoslov.Istorija jazyka. Istorija kultury. Moscow: Russkij fond sodejstvija obrazovaniju i nauke, 277-292.

Abstract

This article examines how the so-called absolute participial constructions (of the type 'God willing' in present-day English) were rendered in late Old English translations of the Latin Vulgate, challenging the widespread opinion that biblical translations are always extremely literal.

This article examines how the so-called absolute participial constructions (of the type 'God willing' in present-day English) were rendered in late Old English translations of the Latin Vulgate, challenging the widespread opinion that biblical translations are always extremely literal.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Absolute participial constructions in late Old English biblical translations
Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > English Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:820 English & Old English literatures
Language:Russian
Date:2012
Deposited On:21 May 2012 15:44
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:35
Publisher:Russkij fond sodejstvija obrazovaniju i nauke
ISBN:978-5-91244-066-3
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-58725

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