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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-59222

Papadatos-Pastos, D; Dedes, K J; de Bono, J S; Kaye, S B (2011). Revisiting the role of antiandrogen strategies in ovarian cancer. The Oncologist, 16(10):1413-1421.

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Androgen receptors are frequently expressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Their role in the development of EOC is not fully understood. In the present review we first discuss the epidemiological data linking a hyperandrogen state to a higher risk for ovarian cancer, second describe in vitro studies of the role of androgens in influencing the growth of EOC, and finally review the completed clinical trials with compounds that exploit the androgen axis in patients with ovarian cancer. The therapeutic approaches that inhibit androgen signaling have so far produced only modest response rates. In the light of new data regarding the role of androgen stimulation in the evolution of EOC and the emergence of new compounds used for the treatment of other hormone-driven malignancies, such as prostate and breast cancer, we provide suggestions for new studies of antiandrogen therapeutics in the treatment of EOC. A specific example is the new agent abiraterone. In addition, we propose a panel of molecules that could be assessed as potential biomarkers that may aid patient selection for this approach in the future.


6 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gynecology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Deposited On:17 Feb 2012 12:33
Last Modified:28 Nov 2013 01:30
Publisher:AlphaMed Press
ISSN:1082-7159 (P) 1549-490X (E)
Publisher DOI:10.1634/theoncologist.2011-0164
PubMed ID:21948654

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