UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Postvoid residuals remain unchanged in patients with postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia after thoracotomy


Wuethrich, P Y; Henning, A; Schweizerhof, M; Kessler, T M; Burkhard, F C (2011). Postvoid residuals remain unchanged in patients with postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia after thoracotomy. Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, 36(1):46-50.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

We found in previous studies that thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) after open renal surgery via lumbotomy significantly impaired bladder function with decreased detrusor contractility and increased postvoid residuals under urodynamic assessment. Here we evaluated the effect of TEA on bladder emptying in patients undergoing thoracotomy.
METHODS:

In a prospective, follow-up study, 13 men and 13 women with an International Prostate Symptom Score of less than 7 and with a postvoid residual of less than 100 mL underwent sonographic assessment of the postvoid residual the day before thoracotomy without TEA and 2 days postoperatively under TEA. The epidural catheter was inserted at level T4/5 or 5/6. Continuous epidural analgesia was maintained with a mixture of bupivacaine 1 mg/mL, epinephrine 2 μg/mL, and fentanyl 2 μg/mL. Primary outcome was the difference in postvoid residual before versus during TEA.
RESULTS:

The postvoid residual did not change significantly preoperatively and postoperatively in men (P = 0.09) and women (P = 0.18). However, a significant decrease in bladder capacity at strong desire to void and voided volumes was observed in women. Of the 3 male patients with an initial International Prostate Symptom Score of 3 or greater and less than 7, all developed a postvoid residual of greater than 100 mL and were older than 50 years.
CONCLUSIONS:

Most patients after thoracotomy had unchanged postvoid residuals under TEA. Our study design does not allow us to determine cause and effect or to make conclusions that are based on comparative, randomized data. However, our observations do yield a hypothesis-generating basis for future clinical trials.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

We found in previous studies that thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) after open renal surgery via lumbotomy significantly impaired bladder function with decreased detrusor contractility and increased postvoid residuals under urodynamic assessment. Here we evaluated the effect of TEA on bladder emptying in patients undergoing thoracotomy.
METHODS:

In a prospective, follow-up study, 13 men and 13 women with an International Prostate Symptom Score of less than 7 and with a postvoid residual of less than 100 mL underwent sonographic assessment of the postvoid residual the day before thoracotomy without TEA and 2 days postoperatively under TEA. The epidural catheter was inserted at level T4/5 or 5/6. Continuous epidural analgesia was maintained with a mixture of bupivacaine 1 mg/mL, epinephrine 2 μg/mL, and fentanyl 2 μg/mL. Primary outcome was the difference in postvoid residual before versus during TEA.
RESULTS:

The postvoid residual did not change significantly preoperatively and postoperatively in men (P = 0.09) and women (P = 0.18). However, a significant decrease in bladder capacity at strong desire to void and voided volumes was observed in women. Of the 3 male patients with an initial International Prostate Symptom Score of 3 or greater and less than 7, all developed a postvoid residual of greater than 100 mL and were older than 50 years.
CONCLUSIONS:

Most patients after thoracotomy had unchanged postvoid residuals under TEA. Our study design does not allow us to determine cause and effect or to make conclusions that are based on comparative, randomized data. However, our observations do yield a hypothesis-generating basis for future clinical trials.

Citations

2 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:January 2011
Deposited On:19 Feb 2012 20:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:39
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:1098-7339
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/AAP.0b013e3182030828
PubMed ID:21455089

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations