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CD154 blockade abrogates allospecific responses and enhances CD4(+) regulatory T-cells in mouse orthotopic lung transplant


Dodd-o, J M; Lendermon, E A; Miller, H L; Zhong, Q; John, E R; Jungraithmayr, W M; D'Alessio, F R; McDyer, J F (2011). CD154 blockade abrogates allospecific responses and enhances CD4(+) regulatory T-cells in mouse orthotopic lung transplant. American Journal of Transplantation, 11(9):1815-1824.

Abstract

Acute cellular rejection (ACR) is a common and important clinical complication following lung transplantation. While there is a clinical need for the development of novel therapies to prevent ACR, the regulation of allospecific effector T-cells in this process remains incompletely understood. Using the MHC-mismatched mouse orthotopic lung transplant model, we investigated the short-term role of anti-CD154 mAb therapy alone on allograft pathology and alloimmune T-cell effector responses. Untreated C57BL/6 recipients of BALB/c left lung allografts had high-grade rejection and diminished CD4(+) : CD8(+) graft ratios, marked by predominantly CD8(+) >CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) allospecific effector responses at day 10, compared to isograft controls. Anti-CD154 mAb therapy strikingly abrogated both CD8(+) and CD4(+) alloeffector responses and significantly increased lung allograft CD4(+) : CD8(+) ratios. Examination of graft CD4(+) T-cells revealed significantly increased frequencies of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cells in the lung allografts of anti-CD154-treated mice and was associated with significant attenuation of ACR compared to untreated controls. Together, these data show that CD154/CD40 costimulation blockade alone is sufficient to abrogate allospecific effector T-cell responses and significantly shifts the lung allograft toward an environment predominated by CD4(+) T regulatory cells in association with an attenuation of ACR.

Abstract

Acute cellular rejection (ACR) is a common and important clinical complication following lung transplantation. While there is a clinical need for the development of novel therapies to prevent ACR, the regulation of allospecific effector T-cells in this process remains incompletely understood. Using the MHC-mismatched mouse orthotopic lung transplant model, we investigated the short-term role of anti-CD154 mAb therapy alone on allograft pathology and alloimmune T-cell effector responses. Untreated C57BL/6 recipients of BALB/c left lung allografts had high-grade rejection and diminished CD4(+) : CD8(+) graft ratios, marked by predominantly CD8(+) >CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) allospecific effector responses at day 10, compared to isograft controls. Anti-CD154 mAb therapy strikingly abrogated both CD8(+) and CD4(+) alloeffector responses and significantly increased lung allograft CD4(+) : CD8(+) ratios. Examination of graft CD4(+) T-cells revealed significantly increased frequencies of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cells in the lung allografts of anti-CD154-treated mice and was associated with significant attenuation of ACR compared to untreated controls. Together, these data show that CD154/CD40 costimulation blockade alone is sufficient to abrogate allospecific effector T-cell responses and significantly shifts the lung allograft toward an environment predominated by CD4(+) T regulatory cells in association with an attenuation of ACR.

Citations

8 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Thoracic Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2011
Deposited On:25 Feb 2012 16:34
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:39
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1600-6135
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-6143.2011.03623.x
PubMed ID:21827610

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