UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Handedness leads to interhemispheric EEG asymmetry during sleep in the rat


Vyazovskiy, V V; Tobler, I (2008). Handedness leads to interhemispheric EEG asymmetry during sleep in the rat. Journal of Neurophysiology, 99(2):969-975.

Abstract

Sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) slow-wave activity is increased after wakefulness and decreases during sleep. Regional sleep EEG differences are thought to be a consequence of activation of specific cortical neuronal circuits during waking. We investigated the relationship between handedness and interhemispheric brain asymmetry. Bilateral EEG recordings were obtained from the frontal and occipital cortex in rats with a clear paw preference in a food-reaching task (right, n = 5; left, n = 5). While still naïve to the task, no waking or sleep EEG asymmetry was present. During the food-reaching task, the waking EEG showed significant, substantial power increases in the frontal hemisphere contralateral to the dominant paw in the low theta range (4.5-6.0 Hz). Moreover, the non-REM sleep EEG following feeding bouts was markedly asymmetric, with significantly higher power in the hemisphere contralateral to the preferred paw in frequencies >1.5 Hz. No asymmetry was evident in the occipital EEG. Correlation analyses revealed a positive association between the hemispheric asymmetry during sleep and the degree of preferred use of the contralateral paw during waking in frequencies <9.0 Hz. Our findings show that handedness is reflected in specific, regional EEG asymmetry during sleep. Neuronal activity induced by preferential use of a particular forelimb led to a local enhancement of EEG power in frequencies within the delta and sigma ranges, supporting the hypothesis of use-dependent local sleep regulation. We conclude that inherent laterality is manifested when animals are exposed to complex behavioral tasks, and sleep plays a role in consolidating the hemispheric dominance of the brain.

Sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) slow-wave activity is increased after wakefulness and decreases during sleep. Regional sleep EEG differences are thought to be a consequence of activation of specific cortical neuronal circuits during waking. We investigated the relationship between handedness and interhemispheric brain asymmetry. Bilateral EEG recordings were obtained from the frontal and occipital cortex in rats with a clear paw preference in a food-reaching task (right, n = 5; left, n = 5). While still naïve to the task, no waking or sleep EEG asymmetry was present. During the food-reaching task, the waking EEG showed significant, substantial power increases in the frontal hemisphere contralateral to the dominant paw in the low theta range (4.5-6.0 Hz). Moreover, the non-REM sleep EEG following feeding bouts was markedly asymmetric, with significantly higher power in the hemisphere contralateral to the preferred paw in frequencies >1.5 Hz. No asymmetry was evident in the occipital EEG. Correlation analyses revealed a positive association between the hemispheric asymmetry during sleep and the degree of preferred use of the contralateral paw during waking in frequencies <9.0 Hz. Our findings show that handedness is reflected in specific, regional EEG asymmetry during sleep. Neuronal activity induced by preferential use of a particular forelimb led to a local enhancement of EEG power in frequencies within the delta and sigma ranges, supporting the hypothesis of use-dependent local sleep regulation. We conclude that inherent laterality is manifested when animals are exposed to complex behavioral tasks, and sleep plays a role in consolidating the hemispheric dominance of the brain.

Citations

31 citations in Web of Science®
40 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

70 downloads since deposited on 11 Dec 2008
16 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:February 2008
Deposited On:11 Dec 2008 11:08
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:35
Publisher:American Physiological Society
ISSN:0022-3077
Publisher DOI:10.1152/jn.01154.2007
PubMed ID:18077659
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-5982

Download

[img]
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 354kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations