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Peripheral circadian oscillators: interesting mechanisms and powerful tools


Cuninkova, L; Brown, S A (2008). Peripheral circadian oscillators: interesting mechanisms and powerful tools. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1129:358-370.

Abstract

The lives of plants, animals, and human beings are all regulated by circadian clocks. In mammals, 24-hour rhythms of physiology and behavior are directed by a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the brain hypothalamus, which in turn entrains "slave" oscillators of similar molecular composition in most cells of the body. These peripheral clocks are interesting not only because they control many aspects of circadian physiology, but also because they are model systems through which we understand how the SCN regulates complex behavior. To this end, peripheral oscillators have been exploited both biochemically to understand the proteins that make up biological clocks, and genetically to decipher the ways in which individual differences in human chronotype might arise.

The lives of plants, animals, and human beings are all regulated by circadian clocks. In mammals, 24-hour rhythms of physiology and behavior are directed by a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the brain hypothalamus, which in turn entrains "slave" oscillators of similar molecular composition in most cells of the body. These peripheral clocks are interesting not only because they control many aspects of circadian physiology, but also because they are model systems through which we understand how the SCN regulates complex behavior. To this end, peripheral oscillators have been exploited both biochemically to understand the proteins that make up biological clocks, and genetically to decipher the ways in which individual differences in human chronotype might arise.

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37 citations in Web of Science®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2008
Deposited On:24 Nov 2008 10:07
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:35
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0077-8923
Additional Information:Issue title: Molecular and Biophysical Mechanisms of Arousal, Alertness, and Attention
Publisher DOI:10.1196/annals.1417.005
PubMed ID:18591495
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-5987

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