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Dry matter and calcium digestibility in captive veiled chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus)


Hoby, S; Clauss, Marcus; Aebischer, A; Wenker, C; Robert, N; Liesegang, A (2012). Dry matter and calcium digestibility in captive veiled chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus). Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition, 96(5):778-782.

Abstract

Although metabolic bone disease (MBD) is a very common disease in reptiles kept as pets, empirical data on the calcium (Ca) metabolism of reptiles are still scarce. We used the opportunity of a large-scale experimental study on growth and clinical manifestations of MBD in captive veiled chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus) to measure the apparent dry matter (DM) and Ca digestibility in 19 animals (6-49 g), receiving locust nymphs (Locusta migratoria) of two size classes (0.05 and 0.5 g) with or without supplementation of Ca, vitamin A and cholecalciferol (Group A: Ca 0.04-0.09%DM; Group B: Ca 0.47-0.84%DM). Dry matter digestibility was significantly lower for animals receiving smaller-sized prey. A regression analysis of dietary Ca vs. digestible Ca content revealed a complete 'true' digestibility of Ca for the range of investigated diets, which might indicate that requirements for this mineral were not yet exceeded by the diets used (so that a reduction in Ca absorption would be induced). Options of higher dietary Ca provision, and reactions of chameleons to such diets, should be further investigated.

Abstract

Although metabolic bone disease (MBD) is a very common disease in reptiles kept as pets, empirical data on the calcium (Ca) metabolism of reptiles are still scarce. We used the opportunity of a large-scale experimental study on growth and clinical manifestations of MBD in captive veiled chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus) to measure the apparent dry matter (DM) and Ca digestibility in 19 animals (6-49 g), receiving locust nymphs (Locusta migratoria) of two size classes (0.05 and 0.5 g) with or without supplementation of Ca, vitamin A and cholecalciferol (Group A: Ca 0.04-0.09%DM; Group B: Ca 0.47-0.84%DM). Dry matter digestibility was significantly lower for animals receiving smaller-sized prey. A regression analysis of dietary Ca vs. digestible Ca content revealed a complete 'true' digestibility of Ca for the range of investigated diets, which might indicate that requirements for this mineral were not yet exceeded by the diets used (so that a reduction in Ca absorption would be induced). Options of higher dietary Ca provision, and reactions of chameleons to such diets, should be further investigated.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Animal Nutrition
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:17 Mar 2012 19:32
Last Modified:14 Sep 2016 07:21
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0931-2439
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0396.2011.01170.x
PubMed ID:21635572

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