UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging for axial spondyloarthritis


Weber, U; Maksymowych, W P (2011). Sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging for axial spondyloarthritis. American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 341(4):272-277.

Abstract

Diagnosing spondyloarthritis (SpA) early in young patients with inflammatory back pain and normal findings on radiographs of the sacroiliac joints (SIJ) remains a challenge in routine practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as the most sensitive imaging modality for detecting early SpA before the radiographic appearance of structural lesions. The recently published Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society classification criteria for axial SpA include for the first time a positive MRI demonstrating sacroiliitis as an imaging criterion indicative of SpA together with at least 1 clinical feature of SpA. A systematic and standardized evaluation of the SIJ in patients with SpA showed that MRI has much greater diagnostic utility than documented previously and allowed a data-driven definition of a positive MRI for SpA. Single MRI lesions suggestive of inflammation can be found in the SIJ and the spine in up to one quarter of healthy controls and young patients with mechanical back pain.

Diagnosing spondyloarthritis (SpA) early in young patients with inflammatory back pain and normal findings on radiographs of the sacroiliac joints (SIJ) remains a challenge in routine practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as the most sensitive imaging modality for detecting early SpA before the radiographic appearance of structural lesions. The recently published Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society classification criteria for axial SpA include for the first time a positive MRI demonstrating sacroiliitis as an imaging criterion indicative of SpA together with at least 1 clinical feature of SpA. A systematic and standardized evaluation of the SIJ in patients with SpA showed that MRI has much greater diagnostic utility than documented previously and allowed a data-driven definition of a positive MRI for SpA. Single MRI lesions suggestive of inflammation can be found in the SIJ and the spine in up to one quarter of healthy controls and young patients with mechanical back pain.

Citations

13 citations in Web of Science®
15 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 21 Feb 2012
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:21 Feb 2012 18:41
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:40
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0002-9629
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/MAJ.0b013e31820f8c59
PubMed ID:21358308
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-59927

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 225kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations