UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Epidemiology of histocytoses


Zipser, M C; Dummer, R (2011). Epidemiology of histocytoses. In: Dummer, R; Pittelkow, M R; Iwatsuki, K; Green, A; Elwan, N M. Skin cancer - a world-wide perspective. Heidelberg, DE: Springer, 33-34.

Abstract

Langerhans cell histiocytisis (LCH) is the most common of the histiocytic disorders [39]. It represents a spectrum of several clinical entities chracterized by a disorder of antigenpresenting dendritic cells of the immune system. Its epidemiology is poorly understood and based mainly on a few international and regional studies of defined populations [34]. The overall incidence rate varies from 2.6 to 8.9 children per million per year [1, 19, 34, 36]. Children of any age can be affected, however the peak age of presentation, in children, is between the ages of one and three [34]. LCH is also diagnosed in adults [37] but only a few reports are available describing LCH patients with onset during adulthood [3]. Some studies reveal a greater prevalence of LCH among male children [19]. On the other hand, in adults, a preponderance of females is documented with onset as late as the ninth decade of life [26]. Dissemitaned LCH is described to present most frequently in the first year of life [19]. Congenital self-healing LCH is an uncommon form of LCH, which is usually present at birth or in the neonatal period [23].

Langerhans cell histiocytisis (LCH) is the most common of the histiocytic disorders [39]. It represents a spectrum of several clinical entities chracterized by a disorder of antigenpresenting dendritic cells of the immune system. Its epidemiology is poorly understood and based mainly on a few international and regional studies of defined populations [34]. The overall incidence rate varies from 2.6 to 8.9 children per million per year [1, 19, 34, 36]. Children of any age can be affected, however the peak age of presentation, in children, is between the ages of one and three [34]. LCH is also diagnosed in adults [37] but only a few reports are available describing LCH patients with onset during adulthood [3]. Some studies reveal a greater prevalence of LCH among male children [19]. On the other hand, in adults, a preponderance of females is documented with onset as late as the ninth decade of life [26]. Dissemitaned LCH is described to present most frequently in the first year of life [19]. Congenital self-healing LCH is an uncommon form of LCH, which is usually present at birth or in the neonatal period [23].

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:11 Mar 2012 19:04
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:40
Publisher:Springer
ISBN:978-3-642-05071-8 (P) 978-3-642-05072-5 (E)
Publisher DOI:10.1007/978-3-642-05072-5_4
Related URLs:ttp://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&CON_LNG=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=006410635

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations