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High altitude sleep disturbances monitored by actigraphy and polysomnography


Nussbaumer-Ochsner, Y; Schuepfer, N; Siebenmann, C; Maggiorini, M; Bloch, K E (2011). High altitude sleep disturbances monitored by actigraphy and polysomnography. High Altitude Medicine and Biology, 12(3):229-236.

Abstract

AIMS:

Data on sleep at altitude are scant due to the limited availability of polysomnography. Therefore, we investigated whether actigraphy might serve as a simple tool for monitoring sleep during altitude field studies.
METHODS:

Fourteen mountaineers participating in studies on dexamethasone prophylaxis of high altitude pulmonary edema were monitored by actigraphy and polysomnography during 1 night at Zurich (490 m) and 4 nights at the Regina Margherita hut (4559 m). Total sleep time (TST) estimated by actigraphy was compared to polysomnography and subjective sleep quality.
RESULTS:

In 64 comparisons, mean differences±2SD (bias±limits of agreement) between actigraphy and polysomnography were 5±35 min for TST and 1±7% for sleep efficiency. Correlations between subjective and polysomnographic estimates of sleep efficiency and sleep latency were nonsignificant. Medians of nocturnal oxygen saturation were 96% at 490 m and 74%-81% during nights 1 to 4 at 4459 m (p<0.05 vs. 490 m). Medians of polysomnographic TST were similar at 490 m (451 min) and 4559 m (377-456 min during nights 1 to 4, p=NS) but the proportions of slow wave and REM sleep were reduced and arousals were more common (p<0.05 all instances).
CONCLUSION:

Actigraphy accurately estimates sleep efficiency and duration. Due to its portability and simple use and the potential application over several weeks, it is a convenient tool for investigating altitude effects on sleep during field studies.

AIMS:

Data on sleep at altitude are scant due to the limited availability of polysomnography. Therefore, we investigated whether actigraphy might serve as a simple tool for monitoring sleep during altitude field studies.
METHODS:

Fourteen mountaineers participating in studies on dexamethasone prophylaxis of high altitude pulmonary edema were monitored by actigraphy and polysomnography during 1 night at Zurich (490 m) and 4 nights at the Regina Margherita hut (4559 m). Total sleep time (TST) estimated by actigraphy was compared to polysomnography and subjective sleep quality.
RESULTS:

In 64 comparisons, mean differences±2SD (bias±limits of agreement) between actigraphy and polysomnography were 5±35 min for TST and 1±7% for sleep efficiency. Correlations between subjective and polysomnographic estimates of sleep efficiency and sleep latency were nonsignificant. Medians of nocturnal oxygen saturation were 96% at 490 m and 74%-81% during nights 1 to 4 at 4459 m (p<0.05 vs. 490 m). Medians of polysomnographic TST were similar at 490 m (451 min) and 4559 m (377-456 min during nights 1 to 4, p=NS) but the proportions of slow wave and REM sleep were reduced and arousals were more common (p<0.05 all instances).
CONCLUSION:

Actigraphy accurately estimates sleep efficiency and duration. Due to its portability and simple use and the potential application over several weeks, it is a convenient tool for investigating altitude effects on sleep during field studies.

Citations

13 citations in Web of Science®
16 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:04 Mar 2012 10:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:41
Publisher:Mary Ann Liebert
ISSN:1527-0297
Additional Information:This is a copy of an article published in the High Altitude Medicine and Biology © 2011 copyright Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.; High Altitude Medicine and Biology is available online at: http://www.liebertonline.com.
Publisher DOI:10.1089/ham.2010.1073
PubMed ID:21962066
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-60149

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