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Fission-fusion dynamics: New research frameworks


Aureli, F; Schaffner, C M; Boesch, C; Bearder, S K; Call, J; Chapman, C A; Connor, R; Di Fiore, A; Dunbar, R I M; Henzi, S P; Holekamp, K; Korstjens, A H; Layton, R; Lee, P; Lehmann, J; Manson, J H; Ramos-Fernandez, G; Strier, K B; van Schaik, C P (2008). Fission-fusion dynamics: New research frameworks. Current Anthropology, 49(4):627-654.

Abstract

Renewed interest in fission-fusion dynamics is due to the recognition that such dynamics may create unique challenges for social interaction and distinctive selective pressures acting on underlying communicative and cognitive abilities. New frameworks for integrating current knowledge on fission-fusion dynamics emerge from a fundamental rethinking of the term "fission-fusion" away from its current general use as a label for a particular modal type of social system (i.e., "fission-fusion societies"). Specifically, because the degree of spatial and temporal cohesion of group members varies both within and across taxa, any social system can be described in terms of the extent to which it expresses fission-fusion dynamics. This perspective has implications for socioecology, communication, cognitive demands, and human social evolution.

Renewed interest in fission-fusion dynamics is due to the recognition that such dynamics may create unique challenges for social interaction and distinctive selective pressures acting on underlying communicative and cognitive abilities. New frameworks for integrating current knowledge on fission-fusion dynamics emerge from a fundamental rethinking of the term "fission-fusion" away from its current general use as a label for a particular modal type of social system (i.e., "fission-fusion societies"). Specifically, because the degree of spatial and temporal cohesion of group members varies both within and across taxa, any social system can be described in terms of the extent to which it expresses fission-fusion dynamics. This perspective has implications for socioecology, communication, cognitive demands, and human social evolution.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Anthropology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:English
Date:August 2008
Deposited On:01 Dec 2008 15:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:35
Publisher:University of Chicago Press
ISSN:0011-3204
Additional Information:© 2008 by The Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research
Publisher DOI:10.1086/586708
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-6020

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