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Comparison of genotypes and antibiotic resistance of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from humans and slaughtered chickens in Switzerland


Kittl, S; Kuhnert, P; Hächler, H; Korczak, B M (2011). Comparison of genotypes and antibiotic resistance of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from humans and slaughtered chickens in Switzerland. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 110(2):513-520.

Abstract

Aims:  To get an overview of genotypes and antibiotic resistances in Swiss Campylobacter jejuni implicated in human gastroenteritis and to examine the association with isolates from chickens.

Methods and Results:  Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and flaB typing were applied to 136 human clinical isolates. Phenotypic resistance to 12 antimicrobials and genotypic resistance to macrolides and quinolones were determined. MLST resulted in 35 known and six new sequence types (ST). The flaB analysis revealed 35 different types, which – in combination with MLST – increased the resolution of the typing approach. Resistance to quinolones, tetracycline and ampicillin was found in 37·5, 33·1 and 8·1% of the isolates, respectively, whereas macrolide resistance was found only once. Genotypic and phenotypic resistance correlated in all cases. A comparison to Camp. jejuni isolated from slaughtered chickens was performed. While 86% of the quinolone-sensitive human isolates showed overlapping MLST-flaB types with those of chicken origin, resistant strains showed only 39% of matching types.

Conclusion:  Mainly quinolone-sensitive Camp. jejuni strains implicated in human campylobacteriosis showed matching genotypes with isolates originating from chickens.

Significance and Impact of the Study:  A large proportion of human cases in Switzerland are likely to originate from domestic chickens, confirming that prevention measures in the poultry production are important.

Aims:  To get an overview of genotypes and antibiotic resistances in Swiss Campylobacter jejuni implicated in human gastroenteritis and to examine the association with isolates from chickens.

Methods and Results:  Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and flaB typing were applied to 136 human clinical isolates. Phenotypic resistance to 12 antimicrobials and genotypic resistance to macrolides and quinolones were determined. MLST resulted in 35 known and six new sequence types (ST). The flaB analysis revealed 35 different types, which – in combination with MLST – increased the resolution of the typing approach. Resistance to quinolones, tetracycline and ampicillin was found in 37·5, 33·1 and 8·1% of the isolates, respectively, whereas macrolide resistance was found only once. Genotypic and phenotypic resistance correlated in all cases. A comparison to Camp. jejuni isolated from slaughtered chickens was performed. While 86% of the quinolone-sensitive human isolates showed overlapping MLST-flaB types with those of chicken origin, resistant strains showed only 39% of matching types.

Conclusion:  Mainly quinolone-sensitive Camp. jejuni strains implicated in human campylobacteriosis showed matching genotypes with isolates originating from chickens.

Significance and Impact of the Study:  A large proportion of human cases in Switzerland are likely to originate from domestic chickens, confirming that prevention measures in the poultry production are important.

Citations

18 citations in Web of Science®
21 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Food Safety and Hygiene
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:17 Mar 2012 20:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:42
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1364-5072
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2672.2010.04906.x
PubMed ID:21143711

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