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Candidate system analysis in ADHD: Evaluation of nine genes involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission identifies associsation with BRD1


Ribasés, Marta; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Hervás, Amaia; Sánchez-Mora, Cristina; Bosch, Rosa; Bielsa, Anna; Gastaminza, Xavier; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J; Romanos, Marcel; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Casas, Miquel; Bayes, Monica; Cormand, Bru (2012). Candidate system analysis in ADHD: Evaluation of nine genes involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission identifies associsation with BRD1. World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, 13(4):281-292.

Abstract

Objectives: Several pharmacological and genetic studies support the involvement of the dopamine neurotransmitter system in the aetiology of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Based on this information we evaluated the contribution to ADHD of nine genes involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission (DRD1, DRD2, DRD3, DRD4, DRD5, DAT1, TH, DBH and COMT).
Methods: We genotyped a total of 61 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of 533 ADHD patients (322 children and 211 adults), 533 sex-matched unrelated controls and additional 196 nuclear ADHD families from Spain.
Results: The single- and multiple-marker analysis in both population and family-based approaches provided preliminary evidence for the contribution of DRD1 to combined-type ADHD in children (P = 8.8e-04; OR = 1.50 (1.18–1.90) and P = 0.0061; OR = 1.73 (1.23–2.45)) but not in adults. Subsequently, we tested positive results for replication in an independent sample of 353 German families with combined-type ADHD children and replicated the initial association between DRD1 and childhood ADHD (P = 8.4e-05; OR = 3.67 (2.04–6.63)).
Conclusions: The replication of the association between DRD1 and ADHD in two European cohorts highlights the validity of our finding and supports the involvement of DRD1 in childhood ADHD.

Objectives: Several pharmacological and genetic studies support the involvement of the dopamine neurotransmitter system in the aetiology of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Based on this information we evaluated the contribution to ADHD of nine genes involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission (DRD1, DRD2, DRD3, DRD4, DRD5, DAT1, TH, DBH and COMT).
Methods: We genotyped a total of 61 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of 533 ADHD patients (322 children and 211 adults), 533 sex-matched unrelated controls and additional 196 nuclear ADHD families from Spain.
Results: The single- and multiple-marker analysis in both population and family-based approaches provided preliminary evidence for the contribution of DRD1 to combined-type ADHD in children (P = 8.8e-04; OR = 1.50 (1.18–1.90) and P = 0.0061; OR = 1.73 (1.23–2.45)) but not in adults. Subsequently, we tested positive results for replication in an independent sample of 353 German families with combined-type ADHD children and replicated the initial association between DRD1 and childhood ADHD (P = 8.4e-05; OR = 3.67 (2.04–6.63)).
Conclusions: The replication of the association between DRD1 and ADHD in two European cohorts highlights the validity of our finding and supports the involvement of DRD1 in childhood ADHD.

Citations

9 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:11 Mar 2012 10:39
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:42
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:1562-2975
Publisher DOI:10.3109/15622975.2011.584905

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