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Toward real-time particle tracking using an event-based dynamic vision sensor


Drazen, D; Lichtsteiner, P; Hafliger, P; Delbruck, T; Jensen, A (2011). Toward real-time particle tracking using an event-based dynamic vision sensor. Experiments in Fluids, 51(5):1465-1469.

Abstract

Optically based measurements in high Reynolds number fluid flows often require high-speed imaging techniques. These cameras typically record data internally and thus are limited by the amount of onboard memory available. A novel camera technology for use in particle tracking velocimetry is presented in this paper. This technology consists of a dynamic vision sensor in which pixels operate in parallel, transmitting asynchronous events only when relative changes in intensity of approximately 10% are encountered with a temporal resolution of 1 mu s. This results in a recording system whose data storage and bandwidth requirements are about 100 times smaller than a typical high-speed image sensor. Post-processing times of data collected from this sensor also increase to about 10 times faster than real time. We present a proof-of-concept study comparing this novel sensor with a high-speed CMOS camera capable of recording up to 2,000 fps at 1,024 x 1,024 pixels. Comparisons are made in the ability of each system to track dense (rho >1 g/cm(3)) particles in a solid-liquid two-phase pipe flow. Reynolds numbers based on the bulk velocity and pipe diameter up to 100,000 are investigated.

Optically based measurements in high Reynolds number fluid flows often require high-speed imaging techniques. These cameras typically record data internally and thus are limited by the amount of onboard memory available. A novel camera technology for use in particle tracking velocimetry is presented in this paper. This technology consists of a dynamic vision sensor in which pixels operate in parallel, transmitting asynchronous events only when relative changes in intensity of approximately 10% are encountered with a temporal resolution of 1 mu s. This results in a recording system whose data storage and bandwidth requirements are about 100 times smaller than a typical high-speed image sensor. Post-processing times of data collected from this sensor also increase to about 10 times faster than real time. We present a proof-of-concept study comparing this novel sensor with a high-speed CMOS camera capable of recording up to 2,000 fps at 1,024 x 1,024 pixels. Comparisons are made in the ability of each system to track dense (rho >1 g/cm(3)) particles in a solid-liquid two-phase pipe flow. Reynolds numbers based on the bulk velocity and pipe diameter up to 100,000 are investigated.

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21 citations in Web of Science®
23 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Neuroinformatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:1 November 2011
Deposited On:05 Mar 2012 12:00
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:42
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0723-4864
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00348-011-1207-y
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-60624

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