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An instruction language for self-construction in the context of neural networks


Zubler, F; Hauri, A; Pfister, S; Whatley, A M; Cook, M; Douglas, R J (2011). An instruction language for self-construction in the context of neural networks. Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience, 5:57.

Abstract

Biological systems are based on an entirely different concept of construction than human artifacts. They construct themselves by a process of self-organization that is a systematic spatio-temporal generation of, and interaction between, various specialized cell types. We propose a framework for designing gene-like codes for guiding the self-construction of neural networks. The description of neural development is formalized by defining a set of primitive actions taken locally by neural precursors during corticogenesis. These primitives can be combined into networks of instructions similar to biochemical pathways, capable of reproducing complex developmental sequences in a biologically plausible way. Moreover, the conditional activation and deactivation of these instruction networks can also be controlled by these primitives, allowing for the design of a “genetic code” containing both coding and regulating elements. We demonstrate in a simulation of physical cell development how this code can be incorporated into a single progenitor, which then by replication and differentiation, reproduces important aspects of corticogenesis.

Biological systems are based on an entirely different concept of construction than human artifacts. They construct themselves by a process of self-organization that is a systematic spatio-temporal generation of, and interaction between, various specialized cell types. We propose a framework for designing gene-like codes for guiding the self-construction of neural networks. The description of neural development is formalized by defining a set of primitive actions taken locally by neural precursors during corticogenesis. These primitives can be combined into networks of instructions similar to biochemical pathways, capable of reproducing complex developmental sequences in a biologically plausible way. Moreover, the conditional activation and deactivation of these instruction networks can also be controlled by these primitives, allowing for the design of a “genetic code” containing both coding and regulating elements. We demonstrate in a simulation of physical cell development how this code can be incorporated into a single progenitor, which then by replication and differentiation, reproduces important aspects of corticogenesis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Neuroinformatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Self-construction;Simulation;Neural growth;Development;Cortex;Self-organization
Date:1 December 2011
Deposited On:05 Mar 2012 09:48
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:42
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
Series Name:Frontiers in computational neuroscience
ISSN:1662-5188
Publisher DOI:10.3389/fncom.2011.00057
PubMed ID:22163218
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-60632

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