UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Optimised radiological diagnosis of hepatic fungal infection during the treatment of leukemia


Petrausch, Ulf; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Mueller, Nicolas J; Arn, Kornelius; Stussi, Georg; Schanz, Urs (2012). Optimised radiological diagnosis of hepatic fungal infection during the treatment of leukemia. Mycoses, 55(5):447-453.

Abstract

Hepatic fungal infection is a frequent complication in patients receiving intensive chemotherapy for acute leukaemia. Hepatic lesions may be detected using computerised tomographic (CT) scans, but there is no standardised CT protocol for the diagnosis and follow-up of hepatic fungal infection. We therefore retrospectively analysed the number and the volume of hepatic fungal lesions in 24 CT of 20 consecutive patients treated for acute leukaemia during late-arterial and porto-venous phase. The mean number of lesions per patient was 31 (range: 3-105) in the late-arterial and 26 (3-81) in the porto-venous CT (P = 0.026). The mean total volume of all lesions was 6.45 ml in the late-arterial and 4.07 ml in the porto-venous CT representing a 1.6fold difference between the two CT scans (P = 0.008). The total volume of the lesions negatively correlated to the absolute contrast difference between liver parenchyma and liver vein (Pearson correlation, r = -0.62; P = 0.002). In conclusion, the late-arterial CT provides a superior distinction of hepatic lesions due to a delayed perfusion of the outer rim of the fungal lesions resulting in an extended visibility. The late-arterial CT is superior to the porto-venous CT for initial diagnosis and follow-up of hepatic fungal infection.

Abstract

Hepatic fungal infection is a frequent complication in patients receiving intensive chemotherapy for acute leukaemia. Hepatic lesions may be detected using computerised tomographic (CT) scans, but there is no standardised CT protocol for the diagnosis and follow-up of hepatic fungal infection. We therefore retrospectively analysed the number and the volume of hepatic fungal lesions in 24 CT of 20 consecutive patients treated for acute leukaemia during late-arterial and porto-venous phase. The mean number of lesions per patient was 31 (range: 3-105) in the late-arterial and 26 (3-81) in the porto-venous CT (P = 0.026). The mean total volume of all lesions was 6.45 ml in the late-arterial and 4.07 ml in the porto-venous CT representing a 1.6fold difference between the two CT scans (P = 0.008). The total volume of the lesions negatively correlated to the absolute contrast difference between liver parenchyma and liver vein (Pearson correlation, r = -0.62; P = 0.002). In conclusion, the late-arterial CT provides a superior distinction of hepatic lesions due to a delayed perfusion of the outer rim of the fungal lesions resulting in an extended visibility. The late-arterial CT is superior to the porto-venous CT for initial diagnosis and follow-up of hepatic fungal infection.

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 10 Apr 2012
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Hematology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:2012
Deposited On:10 Apr 2012 07:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:42
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0933-7407
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0507.2012.02172.x
PubMed ID:22320220

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 245kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations