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Exploring olfactory sensory networks: Simulations and hardware emulation


Beyeler, M; Stefanini, F; Proske, H; Galizia, G; Chicca, E (2010). Exploring olfactory sensory networks: Simulations and hardware emulation. In: 2010 IEEE Biomedical Circuits and Systems Conference (BioCAS), Paphos, Cyprus, 3 November 2010 - 5 November 2010, 270-273.

Abstract

Olfactory stimuli are represented in a highdimensional space by neural networks of the olfactory system. A great deal of research in olfaction has focused on this representation within the first processing stage, the olfactory bulb (vertebrates) or antennal lobe (insects) glomeruli. In particular the mapping of chemical stimuli onto olfactory glomeruli and the relation of this mapping to perceptual qualities have been investigated. While a number of studies have illustrated the importance of inhibitory networks within the olfactory bulb or the antennal lobe for the shaping and processing of olfactory information, it is not clear how exactly these inhibitory networks are organized to provide filtering and contrast enhancement capabilities. In this work the aim is to study the topology of the proposed networks by using software simulations and hardware implementation. While we can study the dependence of the activity on each parameter of the theoretical models with the simulations, it is important to understand whether the models can be used in robotic applications for real-time odor recognition. We present the results of a linear simulation, a spiking simulation with I&F neurons and a real-time hardware emulation using neuromorphic VLSI chips. We used an input data set of neurophysiological recordings from olfactory receptive neurons of insects, especially Drosophila.

Olfactory stimuli are represented in a highdimensional space by neural networks of the olfactory system. A great deal of research in olfaction has focused on this representation within the first processing stage, the olfactory bulb (vertebrates) or antennal lobe (insects) glomeruli. In particular the mapping of chemical stimuli onto olfactory glomeruli and the relation of this mapping to perceptual qualities have been investigated. While a number of studies have illustrated the importance of inhibitory networks within the olfactory bulb or the antennal lobe for the shaping and processing of olfactory information, it is not clear how exactly these inhibitory networks are organized to provide filtering and contrast enhancement capabilities. In this work the aim is to study the topology of the proposed networks by using software simulations and hardware implementation. While we can study the dependence of the activity on each parameter of the theoretical models with the simulations, it is important to understand whether the models can be used in robotic applications for real-time odor recognition. We present the results of a linear simulation, a spiking simulation with I&F neurons and a real-time hardware emulation using neuromorphic VLSI chips. We used an input data set of neurophysiological recordings from olfactory receptive neurons of insects, especially Drosophila.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Neuroinformatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Event End Date:5 November 2010
Deposited On:12 Mar 2012 12:13
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:43
Publisher:IEEE
Number of Pages:3
ISBN:978-1-4244-7269-7 ; 978-1-4244-7268-0
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1109/BIOCAS.2010.5709623
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-60744

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