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Correlation between sleep and cognitive functions after hemispheric ischaemic stroke


Siccoli, M M; Rölli-Baumeler, N; Achermann, P; Bassetti, C L (2008). Correlation between sleep and cognitive functions after hemispheric ischaemic stroke. European Journal of Neurology, 15(6):565-572.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of a link between sleep and cognitive functions, particularly memory and attention, after stroke. METHODS: We studied 11 consecutive patients with first-ever hemispheric ischaemic stroke within eight days after symptoms onset and nine of them at least three months after stroke. Sleep EEG was recorded with a portable system. Cognitive functions were assessed using a standardized battery of tests allowing the estimation of the most relevant domains of cognition. Five age-matched healthy subjects served as controls. RESULTS: The patients were aged 43 +/- 12 years (18-59). In five patients stroke was right-sided and in six patients left-sided. In the acute stroke phase a correlation between attention and amounts of slow wave sleep (SWS), Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and sleep efficiency was found. In the recovery phase verbal/figural memory and attention significantly improved in most patients. Furthermore, an association between (i) verbal/figural (non-verbal) memory and amounts of SWS, REM sleep and sleep efficiency, and between (ii) attention and sleep efficiency was observed. CONCLUSIONS: The results point to a link between sleep and cognitive functions and their recovery after hemispheric stroke. Further studies are needed to determine the specific nature of this link.

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of a link between sleep and cognitive functions, particularly memory and attention, after stroke. METHODS: We studied 11 consecutive patients with first-ever hemispheric ischaemic stroke within eight days after symptoms onset and nine of them at least three months after stroke. Sleep EEG was recorded with a portable system. Cognitive functions were assessed using a standardized battery of tests allowing the estimation of the most relevant domains of cognition. Five age-matched healthy subjects served as controls. RESULTS: The patients were aged 43 +/- 12 years (18-59). In five patients stroke was right-sided and in six patients left-sided. In the acute stroke phase a correlation between attention and amounts of slow wave sleep (SWS), Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and sleep efficiency was found. In the recovery phase verbal/figural memory and attention significantly improved in most patients. Furthermore, an association between (i) verbal/figural (non-verbal) memory and amounts of SWS, REM sleep and sleep efficiency, and between (ii) attention and sleep efficiency was observed. CONCLUSIONS: The results point to a link between sleep and cognitive functions and their recovery after hemispheric stroke. Further studies are needed to determine the specific nature of this link.

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22 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2008
Deposited On:17 Dec 2008 16:01
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:36
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1351-5101
Additional Information:Full text at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/119416341/PDFSTART
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1468-1331.2008.02119.x
PubMed ID:18410375
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-6075

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