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Pacing strategy and change in body composition during a deca iron triathlon


Herbst, L. Pacing strategy and change in body composition during a deca iron triathlon. 2011, University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine.

Abstract

We investigated the timeline of performances in the three races of the ‘World Challenge Deca Iron Triathlon’, held in 2006, 2007 and 2009, where the athletes completed one Ironman triathlon daily on 10 consecutive days. The association of anthropometric characteristics such as body fat estimated using bioelectrical impedance analysis and previous experience in ultra-triathlon with race time was investigated using multiple linear regression analysis. Forty-nine athletes participated in these three races; 23 (47%) participants completed the race within 8,817 (1,322) min. Day 1 was the fastest with 762 (86) min; the slowest was Day 10 with 943 (167) min (P < 0.05). The time per Ironman increased during the race (P < 0.05). Body mass and fat mass decreased whereas lean body mass increased (P < 0.05). Race time was related to both the number of finished Triple Iron triathlons (P = 0.028) and the personal best time in a Triple Iron triathlon (P < 0.0001). We concluded that performance in a Deca Iron triathlon decreased throughout the competition, with the fastest race on Day 1 and the slowest on Day 10. The number of finished Triple Iron triathlons and the personal best time in a Triple Iron triathlon, but not anthropometry, were related to race time. To conclude, athletes need to have a high number of previously completed Triple Iron triathlons, as well as a fast personal best time in a Triple Iron triathlon, in order to finish a Deca Iron triathlon successfully.

We investigated the timeline of performances in the three races of the ‘World Challenge Deca Iron Triathlon’, held in 2006, 2007 and 2009, where the athletes completed one Ironman triathlon daily on 10 consecutive days. The association of anthropometric characteristics such as body fat estimated using bioelectrical impedance analysis and previous experience in ultra-triathlon with race time was investigated using multiple linear regression analysis. Forty-nine athletes participated in these three races; 23 (47%) participants completed the race within 8,817 (1,322) min. Day 1 was the fastest with 762 (86) min; the slowest was Day 10 with 943 (167) min (P < 0.05). The time per Ironman increased during the race (P < 0.05). Body mass and fat mass decreased whereas lean body mass increased (P < 0.05). Race time was related to both the number of finished Triple Iron triathlons (P = 0.028) and the personal best time in a Triple Iron triathlon (P < 0.0001). We concluded that performance in a Deca Iron triathlon decreased throughout the competition, with the fastest race on Day 1 and the slowest on Day 10. The number of finished Triple Iron triathlons and the personal best time in a Triple Iron triathlon, but not anthropometry, were related to race time. To conclude, athletes need to have a high number of previously completed Triple Iron triathlons, as well as a fast personal best time in a Triple Iron triathlon, in order to finish a Deca Iron triathlon successfully.

Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation
Referees:Rosemann T, Knechtle B
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:10 Mar 2012 12:58
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:43
Additional Information:Vorzeitig publiziert in und Sonderdruck aus: Chinese Journal of Physiology 54(4), 2011 ; Zusammenarbeit mit 7 Co-Autoren (s. ZORA: http://www.zora.uzh.ch/53364/)
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&CON_LNG=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=006671908
http://www.zora.uzh.ch/53364/

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