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Endoscopic ultrasound of the canine abdomen


Gaschen, Lorrie; Kircher, P R; Wolfram, Kathrin (2007). Endoscopic ultrasound of the canine abdomen. Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound, 48(4):338-349.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to develop a standardized procedure for examination of the canine abdomen using endoscopic ultrasound and to describe the organs and structures that could be identified transgastrically. The abdomen of four healthy dogs and two cadavers were examined with endoscopic ultrasound. Five anatomic landmarks were used for standardized imaging of the cranial abdomen. These were the portal vein, splenic head and body, duodenum, left kidney, and aorta. High-resolution images of the following organs and structures could be made: distal esophagus, gastric wall from the cardia to the pylorus, liver, caudal vena cava, hepatic lymph nodes, liver hilus, and associated vessels, trifurcation of the celiac artery as well as the path of its branches and the left pancreatic limb and body. Structures that were more difficult to image were the distal duodenum and right pancreatic limb, the entire jejunum, ileum, and cecum as well as the tail of the spleen. Endoscopic ultrasound allowed excellent visualization of the gastric wall and regional structures without interference with gas artefacts. Centrally located organs such as the pancreas could be well examined transgastrically with endoscopic ultrasound without interference by overlying intestinal segments as is common with transabdominal ultrasound.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to develop a standardized procedure for examination of the canine abdomen using endoscopic ultrasound and to describe the organs and structures that could be identified transgastrically. The abdomen of four healthy dogs and two cadavers were examined with endoscopic ultrasound. Five anatomic landmarks were used for standardized imaging of the cranial abdomen. These were the portal vein, splenic head and body, duodenum, left kidney, and aorta. High-resolution images of the following organs and structures could be made: distal esophagus, gastric wall from the cardia to the pylorus, liver, caudal vena cava, hepatic lymph nodes, liver hilus, and associated vessels, trifurcation of the celiac artery as well as the path of its branches and the left pancreatic limb and body. Structures that were more difficult to image were the distal duodenum and right pancreatic limb, the entire jejunum, ileum, and cecum as well as the tail of the spleen. Endoscopic ultrasound allowed excellent visualization of the gastric wall and regional structures without interference with gas artefacts. Centrally located organs such as the pancreas could be well examined transgastrically with endoscopic ultrasound without interference by overlying intestinal segments as is common with transabdominal ultrasound.

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:July 2007
Deposited On:20 Jul 2012 12:45
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:44
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1058-8183
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1740-8261.2007.00254.x
PubMed ID:17691634

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