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Wide distribution of the cysteine string proteins in Drosophila tissues revealed by targeted mutagenesis.


Eberle, K K; Zinsmaier, K E; Buchner, S; Gruhn, M; Jenni, M; Arnold, Christian; Leibold, C; Reisch, D; Walter, N; Hafen, E; Hofbauer, A; Pflugfelder, G O; Buchner, E (1998). Wide distribution of the cysteine string proteins in Drosophila tissues revealed by targeted mutagenesis. Cell and Tissue Research, 294(2):203-217.

Abstract

The "cysteine string protein" (CSP) genes of higher eukaryotes code for a novel family of proteins characterized by a "J" domain and an unusual cysteine-rich region. Previous studies had localized the proteins in neuropil and synaptic terminals of larval and adult Drosophila and linked the temperature-sensitive paralysis of the mutants described here to conditional failure of synaptic transmission. We now use the null mutants as negative controls in order to reliably detect even low concentrations of CSPs by immunohistochemistry, employing three monoclonal antibodies. In wild-type flies high levels of cysteine string proteins are found not only in apparently all synaptic terminals of the embryonic, larval, and adult nervous systems, but also in the "tall cells" of the cardia, in the follicle cells of the ovary, in specific structures of the female spermatheca, and in the male testis and ejaculatory bulb. In addition, low levels of CSPs appear to be present in all tissues examined, including neuronal perikarya, axons, muscles, Malpighian tubules, and salivary glands. Western blots of isolated tissues demonstrate that of the four isoforms expressed in heads only the largest is found in non-neural organs. The wide expression of CSPs suggests that at least some of the various phenotypes of the null mutants observed at permissive temperatures, such as delayed development, short adult lifespan, modified electroretinogram, and optomotor behavior, may be caused by the lack of CSPs outside synaptic terminals.

The "cysteine string protein" (CSP) genes of higher eukaryotes code for a novel family of proteins characterized by a "J" domain and an unusual cysteine-rich region. Previous studies had localized the proteins in neuropil and synaptic terminals of larval and adult Drosophila and linked the temperature-sensitive paralysis of the mutants described here to conditional failure of synaptic transmission. We now use the null mutants as negative controls in order to reliably detect even low concentrations of CSPs by immunohistochemistry, employing three monoclonal antibodies. In wild-type flies high levels of cysteine string proteins are found not only in apparently all synaptic terminals of the embryonic, larval, and adult nervous systems, but also in the "tall cells" of the cardia, in the follicle cells of the ovary, in specific structures of the female spermatheca, and in the male testis and ejaculatory bulb. In addition, low levels of CSPs appear to be present in all tissues examined, including neuronal perikarya, axons, muscles, Malpighian tubules, and salivary glands. Western blots of isolated tissues demonstrate that of the four isoforms expressed in heads only the largest is found in non-neural organs. The wide expression of CSPs suggests that at least some of the various phenotypes of the null mutants observed at permissive temperatures, such as delayed development, short adult lifespan, modified electroretinogram, and optomotor behavior, may be caused by the lack of CSPs outside synaptic terminals.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:1 November 1998
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:15
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0302-766X
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s004410051170
PubMed ID:9799436

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