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Testing strengths-based interventions: a preliminary study on the effectiveness of a program targeting curiosity, gratitude, hope, humor, and zest for enhancing life satisfaction


Proyer, Rene T; Ruch, Willibald; Buschor, C (2013). Testing strengths-based interventions: a preliminary study on the effectiveness of a program targeting curiosity, gratitude, hope, humor, and zest for enhancing life satisfaction. Journal of Happiness Studies, 14(1):275-292.

Abstract

The study compares the impact of character strengths-based positive interventions in a sample of 178 adults. An experimental group that trained strengths of the
Values-in-Action classification that typically correlate highly with life satisfaction (curiosity, gratitude, hope, humor, and zest) was compared in its gain in life satisfaction with a group that trained strengths that usually demonstrate low correlations with life satisfaction
(appreciation of beauty and excellence, creativity, kindness, love of learning, and perspective)
and a wait-list control group. If pre and post measures in life satisfaction were compared, the group with the strengths most correlated with life satisfaction improved
significantly (statistically) in their satisfaction in comparison to a control group. This could be interpreted as support for the idea that primarily those strengths that correlate highly with life satisfaction should be addressed in strengths-based interventions. When asked for subjective ratings of well-being after the interventions concluded, participants in both intervention groups indicated gains above that of a wait-listed control group. Further analyses underscore the special role of self-regulation in facilitating success in the interventions.
Overall, the data underline the potential of strength-based interventions for improving human well-being.

The study compares the impact of character strengths-based positive interventions in a sample of 178 adults. An experimental group that trained strengths of the
Values-in-Action classification that typically correlate highly with life satisfaction (curiosity, gratitude, hope, humor, and zest) was compared in its gain in life satisfaction with a group that trained strengths that usually demonstrate low correlations with life satisfaction
(appreciation of beauty and excellence, creativity, kindness, love of learning, and perspective)
and a wait-list control group. If pre and post measures in life satisfaction were compared, the group with the strengths most correlated with life satisfaction improved
significantly (statistically) in their satisfaction in comparison to a control group. This could be interpreted as support for the idea that primarily those strengths that correlate highly with life satisfaction should be addressed in strengths-based interventions. When asked for subjective ratings of well-being after the interventions concluded, participants in both intervention groups indicated gains above that of a wait-listed control group. Further analyses underscore the special role of self-regulation in facilitating success in the interventions.
Overall, the data underline the potential of strength-based interventions for improving human well-being.

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25 citations in Web of Science®
23 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Character strengths ; Positive psychology ; Positive interventions ; Strengths based intervention ; VIA-IS
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:23 Mar 2012 10:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:45
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1389-4978
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s10902-012-9331-9
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-61433

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