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NMR probes for measuring magnetic fields and field dynamics in MR systems


De Zanche, N; Barmet, C; Nordmeyer-Massner, J A; Pruessmann, K P (2008). NMR probes for measuring magnetic fields and field dynamics in MR systems. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 60(1):176.

Abstract

High-resolution magnetic field probes based on pulsed liquid-state NMR are presented. Static field measurements with an error of 10 nanotesla or less at 3 tesla are readily obtained in 100 ms. The further ability to measure dynamic magnetic fields results from using small (1 L) droplets of MR-active liquid surrounded by susceptibility-matched materials. The consequent high field homogeneity allows free induction decay signals lasting 100 ms or more to be readily achieved. The small droplet dimensions allow the magnetic field to be measured even in the presence of large gradients. Highly sensitive detection yields sufficient SNR to follow the relevant field evolution without signal averaging and at bandwidths up to hundreds of kHz. Transient, nonreproducible effects and drifts are thus readily monitored. The typical application of k-space trajectory mapping has been demonstrated. Potential further applications include characterization, tuning, and maintenance of gradient systems as well as the mapping of the static field distribution of MRI magnets. Connection of the probes to a standard MR spectrometer is similar to that used for imaging coils.

High-resolution magnetic field probes based on pulsed liquid-state NMR are presented. Static field measurements with an error of 10 nanotesla or less at 3 tesla are readily obtained in 100 ms. The further ability to measure dynamic magnetic fields results from using small (1 L) droplets of MR-active liquid surrounded by susceptibility-matched materials. The consequent high field homogeneity allows free induction decay signals lasting 100 ms or more to be readily achieved. The small droplet dimensions allow the magnetic field to be measured even in the presence of large gradients. Highly sensitive detection yields sufficient SNR to follow the relevant field evolution without signal averaging and at bandwidths up to hundreds of kHz. Transient, nonreproducible effects and drifts are thus readily monitored. The typical application of k-space trajectory mapping has been demonstrated. Potential further applications include characterization, tuning, and maintenance of gradient systems as well as the mapping of the static field distribution of MRI magnets. Connection of the probes to a standard MR spectrometer is similar to that used for imaging coils.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:02 Dec 2008 13:07
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:36
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0740-3194
Publisher DOI:10.1002/mrm.21624
PubMed ID:18581363
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-6173

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