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Financial aspects of apprenticeship training in Germany, Great Britain and Switzerland


Ryan, Paul; Wagner, Karin; Teuber, Silvia; Backes-Gellner, Uschi (2011). Financial aspects of apprenticeship training in Germany, Great Britain and Switzerland. Arbeitspapier, Bildung und Qualifizierung 241, Hans Böckler Stiftung.

Abstract

Financial attributes are potentially important influences on the viability of apprenticeship as a mode of vocational education and training. Two financial aspects are considered: apprentices’ pay, which determines the division of training costs between the trainee and the employer; and corporate ownership, which may influence the incentive
to employers to provide training, insofar as it promotes or deters short-termist practice concerning investment in employees’ skills.

Evidence is taken from fieldwork interviews with senior managers in 56 companies, spread across two sectors (metalworking, retailing) in three countries (Germany, Britain, Switzerland). The companies are matched by products and technologies, differentiated by bargaining status and type of ownership.

The importance of apprenticeship relative to recruitment as a source of skills is found to vary greatly across companies. The pay of apprentices differs markedly between
countries (highest in Britain, lowest in Switzerland) in association with the attributes of labour markets, trade unionism, and education systems. Listing on a stock market
and having dispersed ownership are associated with more frequent financial upheaval and a lower training effort than are other ownership types.

Financial attributes are potentially important influences on the viability of apprenticeship as a mode of vocational education and training. Two financial aspects are considered: apprentices’ pay, which determines the division of training costs between the trainee and the employer; and corporate ownership, which may influence the incentive
to employers to provide training, insofar as it promotes or deters short-termist practice concerning investment in employees’ skills.

Evidence is taken from fieldwork interviews with senior managers in 56 companies, spread across two sectors (metalworking, retailing) in three countries (Germany, Britain, Switzerland). The companies are matched by products and technologies, differentiated by bargaining status and type of ownership.

The importance of apprenticeship relative to recruitment as a source of skills is found to vary greatly across companies. The pay of apprentices differs markedly between
countries (highest in Britain, lowest in Switzerland) in association with the attributes of labour markets, trade unionism, and education systems. Listing on a stock market
and having dispersed ownership are associated with more frequent financial upheaval and a lower training effort than are other ownership types.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Finanzielle Aspekte der betrieblichen Ausbildung in Deutschland, Großbritannien und der Schweiz
Item Type:Working Paper
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Business Administration
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:30 Apr 2012 15:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:46
Publisher:Setzkasten GmbH
Series Name:Arbeitspapier, Bildung und Qualifizierung
Number of Pages:116
Official URL:http://www.boeckler.de/5137.htm?produkt=HBS-005146
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:6475
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-61766

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