UZH-Logo

Moderne Blutsverwandtschaften: Die "Blutprobe" und die Biologisierung der Vaterschaft in der Weimarer Republik


Spörri, Myriam (2010). Moderne Blutsverwandtschaften: Die "Blutprobe" und die Biologisierung der Vaterschaft in der Weimarer Republik. L'homme, 21(2):33-49.

Abstract

In the first part, the article examines the medical roots of the idea of “blood relationship” and traces its development since ancient times. With the emergence of cellular pathology in the 19th century, blood lost its status as a “very special fluid” and therefore also as a generative substance. However, as the second part shows, the link between “blood” and “relationship”, though scientifically discredited, was to persist, and manifested
itself in a modern way in blood group research during the early 20th century.
Blood group tests in paternity trials which quickly became popular in the Weimar Republic, referred to the tradition of blood relationship and led to a new train of thought
towards blood being perceived as a generative substance – even if, paradoxically enough, blood groups could strictly speaking only determine non-paternity and not the definitive
relationship between father and child. Furthermore these blood tests point to a fundamental change in the history of paternity, since they are considered the first step in the biologisation of paternity which today seems finalised in DNA paternity testing.

In the first part, the article examines the medical roots of the idea of “blood relationship” and traces its development since ancient times. With the emergence of cellular pathology in the 19th century, blood lost its status as a “very special fluid” and therefore also as a generative substance. However, as the second part shows, the link between “blood” and “relationship”, though scientifically discredited, was to persist, and manifested
itself in a modern way in blood group research during the early 20th century.
Blood group tests in paternity trials which quickly became popular in the Weimar Republic, referred to the tradition of blood relationship and led to a new train of thought
towards blood being perceived as a generative substance – even if, paradoxically enough, blood groups could strictly speaking only determine non-paternity and not the definitive
relationship between father and child. Furthermore these blood tests point to a fundamental change in the history of paternity, since they are considered the first step in the biologisation of paternity which today seems finalised in DNA paternity testing.

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of History
Dewey Decimal Classification:900 History
Language:German
Date:2010
Deposited On:11 May 2012 07:38
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:48
Publisher:Böhlau
ISSN:1016-362X
Related URLs:http://www.boehlau-verlag.com/newbuchliste.aspx?id=7
http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&CON_LNG=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=000998096

Download

Full text not available from this repository.

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations