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Spectroscopic discrimination of shit from Shinola


Painter, T H; Schaepman, M E; Schweizer, W; Brazile, J (2007). Spectroscopic discrimination of shit from Shinola. Annals of Improbable Research, 13(5):22-23.

Abstract

We conducted an experiment to determine whether people can tell shit from Shinola.
Shinola is a brand of shoe polish once manufactured in the United States. Today we care about Shinola only because it is part of the slang expression “doesn’t know shit from Shinola,” meaning “is completely ignorant.” Shinola is posited for comparison with shit because the two substances have a similar dark brown color and smeary consistency.
The expression now has a special degree of irony. Most people truly do not know shit from Shinola—because they have never heard of Shinola.

We conducted an experiment to determine whether people can tell shit from Shinola.
Shinola is a brand of shoe polish once manufactured in the United States. Today we care about Shinola only because it is part of the slang expression “doesn’t know shit from Shinola,” meaning “is completely ignorant.” Shinola is posited for comparison with shit because the two substances have a similar dark brown color and smeary consistency.
The expression now has a special degree of irony. Most people truly do not know shit from Shinola—because they have never heard of Shinola.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:20 Jul 2012 23:04
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:49
Publisher:Improbable Research
ISSN:1079-5146
Official URL:http://www.improbable.com/airchives/paperair/volume13/v13i5/v13i5.html
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-62445

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