UZH-Logo

Cartilage destruction in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis) is mediated by human fibroblasts after transplantation into immunodeficient mice


Kesel, Nina; Köhler, Dorothee; Herich, Lena; Laudien, Martin; Holl-Ulrich, Konstanze; Jüngel, Astrid; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen; Gay, Renate E; Csernok, Elena; Lamprecht, Peter; Gross, Wolfgang L; Schumacher, Udo; Ullrich, Sebastian (2012). Cartilage destruction in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis) is mediated by human fibroblasts after transplantation into immunodeficient mice. American Journal of Pathology, 180(5):2144-2155.

Abstract

A key feature of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA; or Wegener's granulomatosis) is the granulomatous inflammation of the upper respiratory tract, which leads to the subsequent destruction of adjacent tissues. The aim of our work was to study the histopathological and cellular components of tissue destruction of human GPA tissue transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Biopsy specimens from patients with active GPA (n = 10) or sinusitis (controls, n = 6) were s.c. co-implanted with healthy allogeneic human nasal cartilage into immunodeficient pfp/rag2(-/-) mice. Transplants were examined for their destructive capability of the allografted human cartilage. In addition, nasal fibroblasts from patients with GPA (n = 8) and control healthy nasal fibroblasts (n = 5) were cultured, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were quantified. mRNA and protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases and cytokines were evaluated at baseline and after proinflammatory stimulation. GPA implants showed massive destruction of the co-implanted human cartilage, whereas cartilage destruction was only marginal in control samples. Destruction was mediated by human fibroblasts and could be inhibited by corticoid treatment. The up-regulated production of matrix metalloproteinases 1, 3, and 13 and cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 was found in vivo and in vitro. Although proliferation of isolated fibroblasts was comparable between GPA and controls, GPA samples showed a significant delay of apoptosis. The destruction of nasal cartilage in GPA is mainly mediated by fibroblasts that can be blocked by corticosteroids, and this tissue destruction is not dependent on the influx of leukocytes.

A key feature of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA; or Wegener's granulomatosis) is the granulomatous inflammation of the upper respiratory tract, which leads to the subsequent destruction of adjacent tissues. The aim of our work was to study the histopathological and cellular components of tissue destruction of human GPA tissue transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Biopsy specimens from patients with active GPA (n = 10) or sinusitis (controls, n = 6) were s.c. co-implanted with healthy allogeneic human nasal cartilage into immunodeficient pfp/rag2(-/-) mice. Transplants were examined for their destructive capability of the allografted human cartilage. In addition, nasal fibroblasts from patients with GPA (n = 8) and control healthy nasal fibroblasts (n = 5) were cultured, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were quantified. mRNA and protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases and cytokines were evaluated at baseline and after proinflammatory stimulation. GPA implants showed massive destruction of the co-implanted human cartilage, whereas cartilage destruction was only marginal in control samples. Destruction was mediated by human fibroblasts and could be inhibited by corticoid treatment. The up-regulated production of matrix metalloproteinases 1, 3, and 13 and cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 was found in vivo and in vitro. Although proliferation of isolated fibroblasts was comparable between GPA and controls, GPA samples showed a significant delay of apoptosis. The destruction of nasal cartilage in GPA is mainly mediated by fibroblasts that can be blocked by corticosteroids, and this tissue destruction is not dependent on the influx of leukocytes.

Citations

11 citations in Web of Science®
12 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Rheumatology Clinic and Institute of Physical Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:04 Jun 2012 09:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:49
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0002-9440
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.ajpath.2012.01.021
PubMed ID:22449947

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations