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The efficacy of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program in improving parenting and child behavior: a comparison with two other treatment conditions


Bodenmann, Guy; Cina, A; Ledermann, T; Sanders, M R (2008). The efficacy of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program in improving parenting and child behavior: a comparison with two other treatment conditions. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 46(4):411-427.

Abstract

The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the efficacy of an evidence-based parenting program (the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program), intending to improve parenting skills and children’s well-being. Parents participating in a Group Triple P program (n = 50 couples) were compared to parents of a non-treated control group (n = 50 couples) and parents participating in a marital distress prevention program (Couples Coping Enhancement Training: CCET) (n = 50 couples). The two major goals of this study were: (a) to evaluate the efficacy of Triple P compared to the two other treatment conditions over a time-span of one year and (b) to answer the question whether this program that was developed in Australia is culturally accepted by Swiss parents. Results revealed that Triple P was effective with Swiss families. Mothers of the Triple P group showed significant improvements in parenting, parenting self-esteem, and a decrease in stressors related to parenting. Women trained in Triple P also reported significantly lower rates of child’s misbehavior than women of the two other conditions. However, in men only a few significant results were found. Positive effects of the relationship training (CCET) were somewhat lower than those for the Triple P. These findings are further discussed.

The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the efficacy of an evidence-based parenting program (the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program), intending to improve parenting skills and children’s well-being. Parents participating in a Group Triple P program (n = 50 couples) were compared to parents of a non-treated control group (n = 50 couples) and parents participating in a marital distress prevention program (Couples Coping Enhancement Training: CCET) (n = 50 couples). The two major goals of this study were: (a) to evaluate the efficacy of Triple P compared to the two other treatment conditions over a time-span of one year and (b) to answer the question whether this program that was developed in Australia is culturally accepted by Swiss parents. Results revealed that Triple P was effective with Swiss families. Mothers of the Triple P group showed significant improvements in parenting, parenting self-esteem, and a decrease in stressors related to parenting. Women trained in Triple P also reported significantly lower rates of child’s misbehavior than women of the two other conditions. However, in men only a few significant results were found. Positive effects of the relationship training (CCET) were somewhat lower than those for the Triple P. These findings are further discussed.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Positive Parenting Program (Triple P), Couples Coping Enhancement Training (CCET), efficacy, parenting, intervention
Language:English
Date:April 2008
Deposited On:19 Dec 2008 14:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:36
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0005-7967
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.brat.2008.01.001
PubMed ID:18313033
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-6261

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