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PTEN affects cell size, cell proliferation and apoptosis during Drosophila eye development.


Huang, H; Potter, C J; Tao, W; Li, D M; Brogiolo, W; Hafen, E; Sun, H; Xu, T (1999). PTEN affects cell size, cell proliferation and apoptosis during Drosophila eye development. Development, 126(23):5365-5372.

Abstract

Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (MMAC1/TEP1) are associated with a large number of human cancers and several autosomal-dominant disorders. Mice mutant for PTEN die at early embryonic stages and the mutant embryonic fibroblasts display decreased sensitivity to cell death. Overexpression of PTEN in different mammalian tissue culture cells affects various processes including cell proliferation, cell death and cell migration. We have characterized the Drosophila PTEN gene and present evidence that both inactivation and overexpression of PTEN affect cell size, while overexpression of PTEN also inhibits cell cycle progression at early mitosis and promotes cell death during eye development in a context-dependent manner. Furthermore, we have shown that PTEN acts in the insulin signaling pathway and all signals from the insulin receptor can be antagonized by either Drosophila or human PTEN, suggesting a potential means for alleviating symptoms associated with altered insulin signaling.

Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (MMAC1/TEP1) are associated with a large number of human cancers and several autosomal-dominant disorders. Mice mutant for PTEN die at early embryonic stages and the mutant embryonic fibroblasts display decreased sensitivity to cell death. Overexpression of PTEN in different mammalian tissue culture cells affects various processes including cell proliferation, cell death and cell migration. We have characterized the Drosophila PTEN gene and present evidence that both inactivation and overexpression of PTEN affect cell size, while overexpression of PTEN also inhibits cell cycle progression at early mitosis and promotes cell death during eye development in a context-dependent manner. Furthermore, we have shown that PTEN acts in the insulin signaling pathway and all signals from the insulin receptor can be antagonized by either Drosophila or human PTEN, suggesting a potential means for alleviating symptoms associated with altered insulin signaling.

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204 citations in Web of Science®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:1 December 1999
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:15
Publisher:Company of Biologists
ISSN:0950-1991
Related URLs:http://dev.biologists.org/cgi/content/abstract/126/23/5365
PubMed ID:10556061
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-627

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