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Effects of pine processionary caterpillar Thaumetopoea pityocampa contact in dogs: 41 cases (2002-2006)


Niza, M E; Ferreira, R L; Coimbra, I V; Guerreiro, H M; Félix, N M; Matos, J M; de Brito, T V; Vilela, C L (2012). Effects of pine processionary caterpillar Thaumetopoea pityocampa contact in dogs: 41 cases (2002-2006). Zoonoses and Public Health, 59(1):35-38.

Abstract

The pine processionary caterpillar, Thaumetopoea pityocampa, is considered an emerging pine pest in Mediterranean countries, with high medical relevance. In recent years, adverse reactions reports in humans following contact with T. pityocampa have been increasingly reported. Dogs living in pinewood areas are also frequently exposed to the caterpillar. This work consisted on a retrospective study of 41 cases of lepidopterism. All dogs presented drooling, dysphagia, submandibular lymphadenomegaly and clinical signs of pain. The animals were distributed in three groups, according to the time span from exposure to the caterpillar until presentation: up to 2 h (group 1), 2-5 h (group 2) and more than 5 h (group 3). All animals from groups 2 (n = 5) and 3 (n = 9), and eight dogs from group 1 (n = 27) developed lingual necrosis. Lepidopterism coursed through a predictable clinical pattern. The evolution was mainly dependent on the time span between exposure to the caterpillar and medical intervention, which should take place earlier than 2 h from exposure.

The pine processionary caterpillar, Thaumetopoea pityocampa, is considered an emerging pine pest in Mediterranean countries, with high medical relevance. In recent years, adverse reactions reports in humans following contact with T. pityocampa have been increasingly reported. Dogs living in pinewood areas are also frequently exposed to the caterpillar. This work consisted on a retrospective study of 41 cases of lepidopterism. All dogs presented drooling, dysphagia, submandibular lymphadenomegaly and clinical signs of pain. The animals were distributed in three groups, according to the time span from exposure to the caterpillar until presentation: up to 2 h (group 1), 2-5 h (group 2) and more than 5 h (group 3). All animals from groups 2 (n = 5) and 3 (n = 9), and eight dogs from group 1 (n = 27) developed lingual necrosis. Lepidopterism coursed through a predictable clinical pattern. The evolution was mainly dependent on the time span between exposure to the caterpillar and medical intervention, which should take place earlier than 2 h from exposure.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:07 Jun 2012 09:01
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:51
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1863-1959
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1863-2378.2011.01415.x
PubMed ID:21824369
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-62881

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