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Effects of Coping-Oriented Couples Therapy on Depression: A Randomized Clinical Trial


Bodenmann, Guy; Plancherel, Bernard; Beach, Steven R H; Widmer, Kathrin; Gabriel, Barbara; Meuwly, Nathalie; Charvoz, Linda; Hautzinger, Martin; Schramm, Elisabeth (2008). Effects of Coping-Oriented Couples Therapy on Depression: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 76(6):944-954.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of treating depression with coping-oriented couples therapy (COCT) as compared with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT: A. T. Beck. C. Ward. & A Mendelson. 1961) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT; A M. Weissman, J. C. Markowitz, & G. L. Klerman, 2000). Sixty couples, including I clinically depressed partner, completed pre- and posttest questionnaires as well as follow-up assessments at 6-month intervals over the subsequent 1.5 years. Effects of the 3 treatments on depressive symptomatology assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (A. T. Beck, A. J. Rush, B. L. Shaw, & G. Emery, 1979) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (M. Hamilton, 1960); recovery rates and relapse rates were examined. Additionally. changes in relationship quality were evaluated. Results suggest that the COCT is as effective in improving depressive symptomatology as are the well-established, evidenced-based CBT and IPT approaches. The COCT did not demonstrate a significantly better outcome with regard to self-reported relationship satisfaction or dyadic coping; however. it did produce significant improvements in partners' expressed emotion, changes that were not seen in other treatment conditions.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of treating depression with coping-oriented couples therapy (COCT) as compared with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT: A. T. Beck. C. Ward. & A Mendelson. 1961) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT; A M. Weissman, J. C. Markowitz, & G. L. Klerman, 2000). Sixty couples, including I clinically depressed partner, completed pre- and posttest questionnaires as well as follow-up assessments at 6-month intervals over the subsequent 1.5 years. Effects of the 3 treatments on depressive symptomatology assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (A. T. Beck, A. J. Rush, B. L. Shaw, & G. Emery, 1979) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (M. Hamilton, 1960); recovery rates and relapse rates were examined. Additionally. changes in relationship quality were evaluated. Results suggest that the COCT is as effective in improving depressive symptomatology as are the well-established, evidenced-based CBT and IPT approaches. The COCT did not demonstrate a significantly better outcome with regard to self-reported relationship satisfaction or dyadic coping; however. it did produce significant improvements in partners' expressed emotion, changes that were not seen in other treatment conditions.

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60 citations in Web of Science®
61 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:27 Jul 2012 09:11
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:54
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:0022-006X
Additional Information:
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1037/a0013467

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