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Long-distance navigation in the wandering desert spider Leucorchestris arenicola: can the slope of the dune surface provide a compass cue?


Nørgaard, T; Henschel, J R; Wehner, R (2003). Long-distance navigation in the wandering desert spider Leucorchestris arenicola: can the slope of the dune surface provide a compass cue? Journal of Comparative Physiology A, 189(11):801-809.

Abstract

Males of the nocturnal spider Leucorchestris arenicola (Araneae: Sparassidae) wander long distances over seemingly featureless dune surfaces in the Namib Desert searching for females. The spiders live in burrows to which they return after nearly every such excursion. While the outward path of an excursion may be a meandering search, the return path is often a nearly straight line leading towards the burrow. This navigational behaviour resembles that of path integration known from other arthropods, though on a much larger scale (over tens to hundreds of meters). Theoretically, precise navigation by path integration over long distances requires an external compass in order to adjust for inevitable accumulation of navigational errors. As a first step towards identifying any nocturnal compass cues used by the male spiders, a method for detailed 3-D recordings of the spider's paths was developed. The 3-D reconstructions of the paths revealed details about the processes involved in the spiders' nocturnal way of navigation. Analyses of the reconstructed paths suggest that gravity (slope of the dune surface) is an unlikely parameter used in path integration by the L. arenicola spiders.

Males of the nocturnal spider Leucorchestris arenicola (Araneae: Sparassidae) wander long distances over seemingly featureless dune surfaces in the Namib Desert searching for females. The spiders live in burrows to which they return after nearly every such excursion. While the outward path of an excursion may be a meandering search, the return path is often a nearly straight line leading towards the burrow. This navigational behaviour resembles that of path integration known from other arthropods, though on a much larger scale (over tens to hundreds of meters). Theoretically, precise navigation by path integration over long distances requires an external compass in order to adjust for inevitable accumulation of navigational errors. As a first step towards identifying any nocturnal compass cues used by the male spiders, a method for detailed 3-D recordings of the spider's paths was developed. The 3-D reconstructions of the paths revealed details about the processes involved in the spiders' nocturnal way of navigation. Analyses of the reconstructed paths suggest that gravity (slope of the dune surface) is an unlikely parameter used in path integration by the L. arenicola spiders.

Citations

15 citations in Web of Science®
17 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:1 November 2003
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:15
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0340-7594
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00359-003-0455-6
PubMed ID:14520496

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