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Organ transplantation and skin--principles and concepts


Hofbauer, Günther F L; Freiberger, Sandra N; Iotzova-Weiss, Guergana; Shafaeddin, Bahar; Dziunycz, Piotr J (2012). Organ transplantation and skin--principles and concepts. Current Problems in Dermatology, 43:1-8.

Abstract

Solid organ transplantation influences the biology of the skin profoundly. In the wake of transplantation, inflammatory, infectious and neoplastic disorders arise, often with atypical clinical presentation. Inflammatory disorders mainly relate to pathogen-driven conditions such as seborrheic dermatitis and pityrosporum folliculitis and to drug reactions. Infectious disorders are dominated by viral infections of human papilloma virus and by infections and reactivations of herpes family members. Neoplastic disorders are greatly increased with squamous cell carcinoma of the skin as most relevant clinical problem which is increased 65- to 100-fold following transplantation. This dramatic increase in cutaneous carcinogenesis results from the isolated effect of ultraviolet light on the skin with immunosuppression and DNA damage and of immunosuppressants which drive skin cancer formation by properties unrelated to immunosuppression and from the combined effect of UV light and immunosuppressive drugs on immunomodulation which results in impaired antitumor response as well as chronic tumorigenic inflammation.

Solid organ transplantation influences the biology of the skin profoundly. In the wake of transplantation, inflammatory, infectious and neoplastic disorders arise, often with atypical clinical presentation. Inflammatory disorders mainly relate to pathogen-driven conditions such as seborrheic dermatitis and pityrosporum folliculitis and to drug reactions. Infectious disorders are dominated by viral infections of human papilloma virus and by infections and reactivations of herpes family members. Neoplastic disorders are greatly increased with squamous cell carcinoma of the skin as most relevant clinical problem which is increased 65- to 100-fold following transplantation. This dramatic increase in cutaneous carcinogenesis results from the isolated effect of ultraviolet light on the skin with immunosuppression and DNA damage and of immunosuppressants which drive skin cancer formation by properties unrelated to immunosuppression and from the combined effect of UV light and immunosuppressive drugs on immunomodulation which results in impaired antitumor response as well as chronic tumorigenic inflammation.

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3 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:26 Jul 2012 11:45
Last Modified:17 Jun 2016 08:56
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1421-5721
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000335137
PubMed ID:22377915

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