UZH-Logo

European dominance in Triple Iron ultra-triathlons from 1988 to 2011


Jeffery, S; Knechtle, B; Rüst, C A; Knechtle, P; Rosemann, T; Lepers, R (2012). European dominance in Triple Iron ultra-triathlons from 1988 to 2011. Journal of Science and Cycling, 1(1):30-38.

Abstract

The aims of this study were (i) to investigate the participation in Triple Iron ultra-triathlons covering 11.4 km swimming, 540 km cycling, and 126.6 km running between 1988 and 2011 and (ii) to analyze the nationalities of the athletes achieving the fastest swimming, cycling, running and overall race times. Six out of seven races worldwide were held in Europe. Participation of male Triple Iron ultra-triathlons increased over the 24-year period while the participation of females remained stable at ~8% of the total field. Out of the 1,258 participants, 1.077 athletes (85.6%) originated from Europe. The number of male European athletes (r2 = 0.23; P = 0.02) and male North American athletes (r2 = 0.35; P < 0.01) increased across years. European males (2.161 ± 168.5 min) were faster (P < 0.05) than both European females (2.615 ± 327.2 min) and North American males (2.850 ± 370.6 min). Male European athletes improved (r2 = 0.18; P = 0.043), while European females impaired (r2 = 0.48; P = 0.001) overall race time. To summarize, participation in Triple Iron ultra-triathlon increased across years where most of the participants originated from Europe. European males achieved the fastest overall race times and improved their performance across years. Future studies need to investigate what motivates these athletes to compete in these races.

The aims of this study were (i) to investigate the participation in Triple Iron ultra-triathlons covering 11.4 km swimming, 540 km cycling, and 126.6 km running between 1988 and 2011 and (ii) to analyze the nationalities of the athletes achieving the fastest swimming, cycling, running and overall race times. Six out of seven races worldwide were held in Europe. Participation of male Triple Iron ultra-triathlons increased over the 24-year period while the participation of females remained stable at ~8% of the total field. Out of the 1,258 participants, 1.077 athletes (85.6%) originated from Europe. The number of male European athletes (r2 = 0.23; P = 0.02) and male North American athletes (r2 = 0.35; P < 0.01) increased across years. European males (2.161 ± 168.5 min) were faster (P < 0.05) than both European females (2.615 ± 327.2 min) and North American males (2.850 ± 370.6 min). Male European athletes improved (r2 = 0.18; P = 0.043), while European females impaired (r2 = 0.48; P = 0.001) overall race time. To summarize, participation in Triple Iron ultra-triathlon increased across years where most of the participants originated from Europe. European males achieved the fastest overall race times and improved their performance across years. Future studies need to investigate what motivates these athletes to compete in these races.

Downloads

50 downloads since deposited on 30 Aug 2012
16 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:30 Aug 2012 09:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:56
Publisher:Cycling Research Center
ISSN:2254-7053
Official URL:http://www.jsc-journal.com/ojs/index.php?journal=JSC&page=article&op=view&path%5B%5D=10
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-64371

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 604kB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations