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Non-interactive multiple predator effects on tadpole survival


Ramos Real, O J; Van Buskirk, J (2012). Non-interactive multiple predator effects on tadpole survival. Oecologia, 169(2):535-539.

Abstract

We estimated interactions among and within three species of predator in their effects on prey survival using short-term predation experiments. The prey were Rana temporaria tadpoles, and the predators were dragonfly larvae (Anax imperator), newts (Triturus alpestris), and backswimmers (Notonecta glauca). Mortality rate per predator imposed by Triturus and Notonecta did not decline with predator density, whereas the predation rate of Anax was strongly reduced when the number of predator individuals increased. Impacts of all three predators were not altered by the presence of other species in pairwise combinations. This system is therefore characterized by interference between individual dragonflies but relatively independent effects of predator species. These results were largely predictable based on the natural history of the predators, and are encouraging for attempts to model communities as assemblages of interacting species.

Abstract

We estimated interactions among and within three species of predator in their effects on prey survival using short-term predation experiments. The prey were Rana temporaria tadpoles, and the predators were dragonfly larvae (Anax imperator), newts (Triturus alpestris), and backswimmers (Notonecta glauca). Mortality rate per predator imposed by Triturus and Notonecta did not decline with predator density, whereas the predation rate of Anax was strongly reduced when the number of predator individuals increased. Impacts of all three predators were not altered by the presence of other species in pairwise combinations. This system is therefore characterized by interference between individual dragonflies but relatively independent effects of predator species. These results were largely predictable based on the natural history of the predators, and are encouraging for attempts to model communities as assemblages of interacting species.

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3 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:12 Sep 2012 09:03
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:56
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0029-8549
Funders:Swiss National Science Foundation
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-011-2208-5
PubMed ID:22159918

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