UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

17 e- rhenium dicarbonyl CO-releasing molecules on a cobalamin scaffold for biological application


Zobi, Fabio; Blacque, Olivier; Jacobs, Robert A; Schaub, Marcus C; Bogdanova, Anna Yu (2012). 17 e- rhenium dicarbonyl CO-releasing molecules on a cobalamin scaffold for biological application. Dalton Transactions, 41(2):370-378.

Abstract

Cyanocobalamin (B(12)) offers a biocompatible scaffold for CO-releasing 17-electron dicarbonyl complexes based on the cis-trans-[Re(II)(CO)(2)Br(2)](0) core. A Co-C≡N-Re conjugate is produced in a short time and high yield from the reaction of [Et(4)N](2)[Re(II)Br(4)(CO)(2)] (ReCORM-1) with B(12). The B(12)-Re(II)(CO)(2) derivatives show a number of features which make them pharmaceutically acceptable CO-releasing molecules (CORMs). These cobalamin conjugates are characterized by an improved stability in aqueous aerobic media over the metal complex alone, and afford effective therapeutic protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in cultured cardiomyocytes. The non-toxicity (at μM concentrations) of the resulting metal fragment after CO release is attributed to the oxidation of the metal and formation in solution of the ReO(4)(-) anion, which is among the least toxic of all of the rare inorganic compounds. Theoretical and experimental studies aimed at elucidating the aqueous chemistry of ReCORM-1 are also described.

Cyanocobalamin (B(12)) offers a biocompatible scaffold for CO-releasing 17-electron dicarbonyl complexes based on the cis-trans-[Re(II)(CO)(2)Br(2)](0) core. A Co-C≡N-Re conjugate is produced in a short time and high yield from the reaction of [Et(4)N](2)[Re(II)Br(4)(CO)(2)] (ReCORM-1) with B(12). The B(12)-Re(II)(CO)(2) derivatives show a number of features which make them pharmaceutically acceptable CO-releasing molecules (CORMs). These cobalamin conjugates are characterized by an improved stability in aqueous aerobic media over the metal complex alone, and afford effective therapeutic protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in cultured cardiomyocytes. The non-toxicity (at μM concentrations) of the resulting metal fragment after CO release is attributed to the oxidation of the metal and formation in solution of the ReO(4)(-) anion, which is among the least toxic of all of the rare inorganic compounds. Theoretical and experimental studies aimed at elucidating the aqueous chemistry of ReCORM-1 are also described.

Citations

39 citations in Web of Science®
39 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 12 Sep 2012
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:12 Sep 2012 13:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:57
Publisher:Royal Society of Chemistry
ISSN:1477-9226
Publisher DOI:10.1039/c1dt10649j
PubMed ID:21881676
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-64605

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 3MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations