UZH-Logo

Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of neat ice Ih


Perakis, Fivos; Hamm, Peter (2012). Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of neat ice Ih. Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP), 14(18):6250-6256.

Abstract

The OH stretch line shape of ice Ih exhibits distinct peaks, the assignment of which remains controversial. We address this longstanding question using two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy of the OH stretch of H2O and the OD stretch of D2O of ice Ih at T=80 K. The isotropic response is dominated by a 2D line shape component which does not depend on the pump pulse frequency. The decay time of the component that does depend on the pump frequency is calculated using singular value decomposition (bi-exponential decay H2O: 30 fs, 490 fs; D2O: 40 fs, 690 fs).The anisotropic contribution exhibits on-diagonal peaks, which decay on a very fast timescale (H2O: 85 fs; D2O: 65 fs), with no corresponding anisotropic cross-peaks. Both isotropic and anisotropic results indicate that randomization of excited dipoles occurs with a very rapid rate, just like in neat liquid water. We conclude that the underlying mechanism relates to the complex interplay between exciton migration and exciton-phonon coupling.

The OH stretch line shape of ice Ih exhibits distinct peaks, the assignment of which remains controversial. We address this longstanding question using two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy of the OH stretch of H2O and the OD stretch of D2O of ice Ih at T=80 K. The isotropic response is dominated by a 2D line shape component which does not depend on the pump pulse frequency. The decay time of the component that does depend on the pump frequency is calculated using singular value decomposition (bi-exponential decay H2O: 30 fs, 490 fs; D2O: 40 fs, 690 fs).The anisotropic contribution exhibits on-diagonal peaks, which decay on a very fast timescale (H2O: 85 fs; D2O: 65 fs), with no corresponding anisotropic cross-peaks. Both isotropic and anisotropic results indicate that randomization of excited dipoles occurs with a very rapid rate, just like in neat liquid water. We conclude that the underlying mechanism relates to the complex interplay between exciton migration and exciton-phonon coupling.

Citations

11 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

63 downloads since deposited on 19 Sep 2012
8 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:19 Sep 2012 11:49
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:57
Publisher:Royal Society of Chemistry
ISSN:1463-9076
Funders:Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF) through NCCR MUST
Additional Information:Persons who receive the PDF must not make it further available or distribute it.
Publisher DOI:10.1039/C2CP23710E
PubMed ID:22246163
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-64648

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 243kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations