UZH-Logo

Painted Songs: Continuity and Change in Indian Folk Art


Kaiser, Thomas (2012). Painted Songs: Continuity and Change in Indian Folk Art. Stuttgart and Zürich: Arnoldsche Art Publishers and Ethnographic Museum of Zurich University.

Abstract

For over 2000 years and until just a few decades ago artists travelled throughout India, using painted picture scrolls to spread stories from the great Indian epics Mahabharata and Ramayana, as well as a wealth of stories about regional Gods and heroes and moral tales, amongst the mostly illiterate rural population. These artists were the creators and bearers of an art form which spread from India across China to Japan, and westward to the Mediterranean region. In the hands of the painters and singers, the picture scrolls became a portable cinema, projection screens for mythical knowledge and an incentive to listen to the songs whilst looking at the scrolls.
Political changes, technical innovation and social turmoil in the twentieth century ushered in profound changes to oral art forms. As their tradition lost significance, the Indian scroll-painting artists also lost their public and their income. Two Bengali picture-scroll traditions still defy adverse conditions; however, whereas the ‘patua’ rose to the challenge, the ‘jadopatia’ failed – their tradition is in terminal decline.
On the basis of around 160 scroll paintings, mostly from the second half of the twentieth century, this publication illustrates the transition of ‘patua’ art from its original function as a vehicle for oral art to a contemporary, visual form of art. It also commemorates the art of ‘jadopatia', which is coming to an end.

For over 2000 years and until just a few decades ago artists travelled throughout India, using painted picture scrolls to spread stories from the great Indian epics Mahabharata and Ramayana, as well as a wealth of stories about regional Gods and heroes and moral tales, amongst the mostly illiterate rural population. These artists were the creators and bearers of an art form which spread from India across China to Japan, and westward to the Mediterranean region. In the hands of the painters and singers, the picture scrolls became a portable cinema, projection screens for mythical knowledge and an incentive to listen to the songs whilst looking at the scrolls.
Political changes, technical innovation and social turmoil in the twentieth century ushered in profound changes to oral art forms. As their tradition lost significance, the Indian scroll-painting artists also lost their public and their income. Two Bengali picture-scroll traditions still defy adverse conditions; however, whereas the ‘patua’ rose to the challenge, the ‘jadopatia’ failed – their tradition is in terminal decline.
On the basis of around 160 scroll paintings, mostly from the second half of the twentieth century, this publication illustrates the transition of ‘patua’ art from its original function as a vehicle for oral art to a contemporary, visual form of art. It also commemorates the art of ‘jadopatia', which is coming to an end.

Additional indexing

Item Type:Monograph
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Department of Social Anthropology and Cultural Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:390 Customs, etiquette & folklore
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
790 Sports, games & entertainment
Uncontrolled Keywords:Jharkand, Bihar, Bengal, Patua, Jadopatia, Jadupatua, chitrakar, India
Language:English
Date:September 2012
Deposited On:05 Oct 2012 05:58
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:58
Publisher:Arnoldsche Art Publishers and Ethnographic Museum of Zurich University
Number of Pages:192
ISBN:978-3-89790-366-1
Official URL:http://www.arnoldsche.com/en/Ethno-Art/PAINTED-SONGS.html
Related URLs:http://www.musethno.uzh.ch/bildrollen

Download

Full text not available from this repository.

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations